September News and Research from the ACDC – Issue 22-09

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Addressing fraudulent pesticides in the agrifood sector

We are adding to the ACDC collection a 2022 article in Agronomy journal about farmer perceptions of fraudulent pesticides in Egypt. Factorial analysis of data from 394 farmers revealed several critical drivers related to buying fraudulent pesticides: beliefs, health and environmental risks, recognition of quality, price, and policies. Findings led the researchers to recommend these actions:
• Reinforce the extant pesticide laws and administration of regulations
• Increase public awareness of the consequences of fraudulent pesticide use
• Improve recognition behavior by detecting fraudulent pesticides with digital technologies among all stakeholders

We note that the pesticide issue extends well beyond one country. You can read the article by open access here.


“Down and Dirty” – A branding campaign among country-lifestyle teens in Virginia

A campaign to assess attitudes and inform teens in Virginia about the risks of chewing tobacco showed results in an article we identified recently in Health Education and Behavior. Youths who “live and breathe country lifestyles” got special attention in this campaign, which involved traditional, digital, and social media. A total of 1,264 13- to 18-year-olds were recruited as participants.

Three waves of attitude assessment during the campaign revealed greater odds of strong attitudes against chew during Waves 2 and 3, compared with Wave 1. Results also indicated that odds of chew use were lower for these high-risk, country-engaged teens at later points of the campaign.

You can read the article by open access here.


Exploring disconnects between cooperatives and their members

Agricultural cooperatives must invest in a mixed strategy of communication channels to reach all profiles and preferences of their members. That advice came from the report of a literature review published earlier this year in the International Journal on Food System Dynamics. Authors searched for empirical articles in five international databases. Findings suggested that “agricultural cooperatives are slow to incorporate more diverse and effective means of communication to reach their varied audiences. … Inconsistent and ineffective communication between agricultural cooperatives and their members can create a disconnect ….”

You can read the article here.


Freedom within a cage

A 2021 article in BMJ Global Health examined how patriarchal gender norms limit women’s use of mobile phones in rural central India. Authors noted that India has one of the highest gender gaps in mobile phone access in the world. Their study focused on a sample of young married women in rural Madhya Pradesh. Findings revealed that phone use among these women was rarely constrained by overt gatekeeping. However, it was limited in ways such as:
• Narrow range of socially acceptable uses for women, compared with men
• Dependence on men for phone ownership
• Lower proximity to phones
• Poorer functionality of women’s phones
• Limited digital skills
• Constraints in time available to use phones.

You can read the article by open access here.


Case study of farmers as drivers of innovation

“Farmers are often overlooked and undervalued as sources of information, but can be powerful drivers of ingenuity and development.” A team of researchers at the University of Western Australia led with this observation in a 2022 research report published in Prometheus.

As a case example, team members evaluated historical developments in the Australian subterranean clover seed production industry. They identified lessons for agricultural innovation in the future and concluded: “Harnessing the creative power of farmers has potential to accelerate agricultural innovation and contribute to solving the considerable challenges facing global agriculture.”

You can read the case study here.


Welcome to our new ACDC associate

We are delighted to welcome Precious Olalere as new graduate assistant in the Agricultural Communications Documentation Center. She joined us during mid-August with a part-time appointment as she undertakes her graduate studies in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois.

Precious earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Ilorin, a federal government-owned university in western Nigeria. She brings research and analytic software experience from Scholars Academy and the Nigerian Stored Products Research Institute (NSPRI) Library.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

September 21-22, 2022
Professional Development Workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Information: https://communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops/

September 22, 2022
“Usage of satellite imagery in agricultural journalism.” Online workshop via Zoom, European Network of Agricultural Journalists (ENAJ). Presenter Jan Labohý is chief executive officer of World from Space.
Information: https://enaj.eu/usage-of-satellite-imagery-in-agricultural-journalism/

October 10-12, 2022
“Cultivating. Connecting.” Fall conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Information: https://nama.org/2022-fall-conference.html

October 13, 2022
Annual Harvest Service and Lunch, British Guild of Agricultural Journalists, in London, England. Information: https://www.gaj.org.uk/harvest-service-and-lunch

October 21-25, 2022
“ScienceWriters 2022.” Meeting of the National Association of Science Writers
(NASW) in Memphis, Tennessee.
Information: https://www.nasw.org/events/sciencewriters-2022-memphis/

November 16-18, 2022
“Providing Choice Information for Agriculture,” National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB) annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention


When you gain lots of influence

We close this issue of ACDC News with a piece of Old Farmer’s Advice which associate Paul Hixson shared with us:

“If you get to thinking you’re a person of some influence, try ordering somebody else’s dog around.”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is an open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

August News and Research from the ACDC – Issue 22-08

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How free press in nations fits with environment-friendly policy

An international analysis recently addressed this relationship. Researchers Inma Martinez-Zarzoso and Jennifer Phillips investigated it with a global sampling of countries. They used data across the period 1994-2015.

Results indicated that lack of press freedom is negatively correlated with stringency of environmental policies.

You can read this 2020 research report in Environment and Development Economics by open access via Cambridge University Press here.


“The dangers of big data extend to farming”

We are adding a 2022 article of that title to the ACDC collection. Author Kelly Bronson of the University of Ottawa, Canada, noted in a June issue of The Conversation that scholars and activists have spent years exposing dangerous effects of big data practices on individual privacy and civil liberties.

However, she suggested, agricultural data are likely to have far-reaching detrimental environmental and social impacts. She cited examples and proposed that, beyond data analysis and infrastructure, digital democracy calls for a fundamental redistribution of decision-making power from a small number of corporate stakeholders to a wider group of citizens who can help answer questions such as: What kind of food system do we want? Which farming techniques and technologies will help us get there?

You can read this article here.


Disconnect between what consumers say about fresh produce – and what they eat

Findings of a March 2022 national survey by Dole Food Company indicated that almost half of adult Americans mostly ignore the benefits of eating fresh fruits and vegetables, despite a widespread acceptance as essential to the health of their families. For example:

• 73% agreed that fruits and vegetables are a healthy choice for their families
• 68% said they think fruits and vegetables taste great
• 51% said they associate eating more produce with positively impacting the environment

However, almost half (48%) said they think the general public is still ignorant about the health and environmental impacts of fresh produce.

You can read a brief summary about the survey here.


Smallholder farmers in Pakistan at the frontlines of COVID-19

An analysis from the early period of COVID-19 sheds light on how these farmers viewed COVID-19, how it challenged them, and what they thought about government lockdown strategies. Researcher Muhammad Ammad Khan conducted research among 384 smallholder farmers in Punjab province. Results revealed:
• The vast majority of respondents were highly aware of the disease
• They had positive attitudes toward the government lockdown strategy
• Some were facing great challenges in access to farm inputs, unavailability of farm laborers, high prices, and selling their farm produce

You can read the 2022 article in the Journal of Rural and Community Development here.


How 18 million Americans could move into rural areas – without leaving home

“About 45 million Americans – 14% of the nation’s inhabitants – are currently classified as living in rural areas. That number could jump to 64 million – an increase of nearly 40% – without anyone moving into a new home.” So reported Devon Brenner and Jesse Longhurst in a 2021 report from The Conversation news service. They were referring to a government proposal to move everyone who lives in places with 50,000 to 100,000 from urban to rural life.

“Making the proposed change would mean 144 areas with populations between 50,000 and 100,000, and the 251 counties they occupy, would no longer be classified as ‘metropolitan,’ but rather as ‘micropolitan’ – and therefore effectively rural.”

In this brief article, authors described some possible social and economic implications of the proposal.

You can read it here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

September 18-21, 2022
Annual conference of the International Food, Wine, and Travel Writers Conference in St. Petersburg, Florida. Information: https://ifwtwa.org/2022-ifwtwa-conference

September 21-22, 2022
Professional Development Workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Information: https://communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops/

September 22, 2022
“Usage of satellite imagery in agricultural journalism.” Online workshop via Zoom, European Network of Agricultural Journalists (ENAJ). Presenter Jan Labohý is chief executive officer of World from Space.
Information: https://enaj.eu/usage-of-satellite-imagery-in-agricultural-journalism/

October 10-12, 2022
“Cultivating. Connecting.” Fall conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Information: https://nama.org/2022-fall-conference.html

October 13, 2022
Annual Harvest Service and Lunch, British Guild of Agricultural Journalists, in London, England. Information: https://www.gaj.org.uk/harvest-service-and-lunch

October 21-25, 2022
“ScienceWriters 2022.” Meeting of the National Association of Science Writers
(NASW) in Memphis, Tennessee.
Information: https://www.nasw.org/events/sciencewriters-2022-memphis/

November 16-18, 2022
National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB). Annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention

“He can fix it”

We close this issue of ACDC News with a perspective from ever-alert associate John Otte. He called attention recently to something he heard from an acquaintance about special creativity found in many local rural communities.

This acquaintance recalled growing up where the proprietor of a fix-it shop maintained he could fix anything – except the crack of dawn and a broken heart.

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUCDocNews22-08. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

July News and Research from the ACDC – Issue 22-07

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Rural youths in India turn into citizen journalists

“At a time when the International Human Rights Day was being celebrated with much excitement across the world, a silent story of change was being scripted in the community hall” of a small town in northern India. So began a recent article in The Hans India. It explained how rural youths were telling government officials about challenges plaguing their villages. As citizen journalists, they discussed issues such as child marriage, problems of dowry, gender discrimination, wearing Ghoonghat Pratha, suffering from hunger, and casteism.

The district collector commended students for advancing the important role of media as a pillar of democracy and for helping build nationhood.

 

You can read the article online here.


A call:  Let’s expand constructive efforts to address destructive social conflicts

Recently we added to the ACDC collection a 13-page road map to address the “destructive-conflict-as-usual way in which the U.S. and so many other societies now commonly address complex, large-scale, intractable conflicts…”

It was written in 2019 by Guy Burgess and Heidi Burgess of the Conflict Information Consortium, University of Colorado. They argue that such conflicts represent the single greatest threat to humanity and the planet. They drafted this statement to describe the challenge and invite suggestions for a broad collaborative effort to manage conflict in constructive rather than destructive ways.

You can read the statement here.


“There’s a lot the Postal Service can do”

A new document in ACDC features a 202l interview with Lisa Graves, political activist and senior fellow of the Center for Media and Democracy. She emphasized the unique, valuable role of the U.S. Postal Service and identified several ways in which it might be more fully engaged in public service. Among the ideas she suggested:

  • A hub for internet access
  • A charging station for electric cars
  • An informal gathering place in local communities
  • Banking services for underbanked communities

 

You can read this interview here.


 How consumers view climate change these days

“Concern about climate change is real for consumers surveyed recently by The Packer,” a news enterprise serving the food industry. Among the respondents, 87% rated addressing climate change as important (25%), very important (24%) or extremely important (38%) to their overall sustainability priorities.

Here are the top five reasons they cited:

  • Combat climate change
  • Improve human health
  • Reduce food waste
  • It’s the responsible thing to do
  • Reduce air pollution

You can read a summary of the survey findings here.


A lingering environmental case study of not listening

“The people of Flint are still suffering,” read the headline of a January 2022 article we have added in ACDC. The article features an interview with investigative reporter Jordan Chariton of the independent news network Status Coup News. This conversation involves a controversial decision in 2014 to switch the source of drinking water in Flint, Michigan – and follow-up disputes about continuing effects of heavy metal poisoning on residents.

Reporter Chariton said “…there’s been a lot of …’we hear you and we’re going to do everything for you.’ But if you talk to the people of Flint, they are still screaming for help.”  He also observed that “the local media of Michigan has essentially continued this narrative that the water is fine now, and let’s move on.”

You can read the interview here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

July 16-20, 2022

“On point.” Agricultural Media Summit in Raleigh, North Carolina. Sponsored by the American Agricultural Editors’ Association (AAEA), Connectiv Agri-Media Committee, and Livestock Publications Council (LPC).

Information: https://agmediasummit.com

July 20-24, 2022

International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors. Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. Information: https://iswne.org/annual_conferences

September 21-22, 2022

Professional Development Workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Information: https://www.communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops/

October 10-12, 2022

National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA). Fall conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Information: https://web.nama.org/events/2022-fall-conference-402/details

November 16-18, 2022

National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB). Annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention


Dealing with life

We close this issue of ACDC News with a piece of advice about observing and dealing with life. It comes from Jerry Apps in his 1998 book, Rural Wisdom.

“Remember to listen for the whispers and look in the shadows.”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

ACDC News – Issue 22-06

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“Media need to treat every day as Earth Day”

The climate crisis is an emergency that demands urgent, sustained attention and action – not a fleeting mention once a month, according to a recent article by Julie Hollar. She was writing on the website of Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR), a media watchdog group based in New York City.

“Any further delay in concerted anticipatory global action on adaptation and mitigation will miss a brief and rapidly closing window of opportunity to secure a livable and sustainable future for all.”

 

You can read the thought piece here.


First of the 2022 articles in JAC

Four new research articles appear in the first 2022 issue of the Journal of Applied Communications.  You can read them online, along with four papers delivered at the most recent conference of the Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences (ACE).

  • “Persuasive effects of metaphors regarding gene-editing in agriculture” by Nellie Hill, Courtney Meyers, Nan Li, David L. Doerfert, and Venugopal Mendu
  • “Characteristics and motivational factors of American equine journalists” by Zoe B. Bowden, Ricky W. Telg, and Lisa K. Lundy
  • “Influence of message theme on consumer perceptions of lab grown meat” by Kellie Kubacak, Courtney Meyers, Hannah L. Ford, Nan Li, and Lindsay Kennedy
  • “Labs and landscapes virtual reality: Student-created forest conservation tours for informal public engagement” by Whitney Stone, Jamie Loizzo, Jacqueline Aenlle, and Peyton Beattie

 

You can read the articles here.


Potential of social network analysis: A case study involving organic food

We recently added a research report about the potential value of social network analysis in understanding consumer perceptions of organic food. An international team of researchers compared the results of 14 studies carried out by using standard research methods with those based on 344,233 posts by 73,380 Instagram users.

Both approaches identified four key areas as factors important to consumers buying organic food:  (1) health consciousness, (2) ecological motives, (3) taste, and (4) hedonism.

 

You can read the journal article by open access for individual use here.


Recognizing a new collection

Sincere thanks to retired communicator Chris Scherer for alerting us to his collection of professional books. Copies of some are already in the University of Illinois Library. However, more than half involve communications related to agriculture and we had not been aware of them. So we are reviewing the books we don’t have and preparing citations for the ACDC database and search system. As a result, online visitors will soon be able to identify and gain access to detailed agricultural communications information otherwise difficult to find.

Books in the new Chris Scherer Collection feature excellent information for professional journalists and communicators as well as researchers, students and others. Subjects range across writing, layout and design, trends in advertising and public relations, and the history of women in journalism.

 

Check with ACDC Associate Jim Evans if you would like to learn more about this collection – or if you have agricultural journalism and communications materials for which you might like to find a home.


Record-high worry about hunger

“One year after the coronavirus pandemic upended Americans’ lives and caused an economic crisis, worry about hunger and homelessness in the country eclipsed concerns about 13 other national issues for the first time. The 55% of U.S. adults who say they personally worry ‘a great deal’ about these consequences of poverty marks an eight-percentage-point increase since last year and the highest in 20 years of measurement.”

 

We recently added this Gallup news item to the ACDC collection. You can read further details about recent results of annual Gallup Poll research here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

June 21-23, 2022

Agricultural Relations Council (ARC). Annual meeting in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Information: https://agrelationscouncil.org

June 27-July 3, 2022

“Smarter farming and food production for green and sustainable growth.” 2022 World Congress of the International Federation of Agricultural Journalists (IFAJ) in Vingsted, Denmark. Hosted by the Danish Food and Agricultural Journalists.

Information:  https://ifaj2020.dk

July 16-20, 2022

“On point.” Agricultural Media Summit in Raleigh, North Carolina. Sponsored by the American Agricultural Editors’ Association (AAEA), Connectiv Agri-Media Committee, and Livestock Publications Council (LPC).

Information: https://agmediasummit.co

July 20-24, 2022

International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors. Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. Information: https://iswne.org/annual_conferences

September 21-22, 2022

Professional Development Workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Information: communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops/

October 10-12, 2022

National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA). Fall conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Information: https://web.nama.org/events/2022-fall-conference-402/details

November 16-18, 2022

National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB). Annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention


From misery freed

We close this issue of ACDC News with an epitaph by Oliver Goldsmith:

“Here lies poor Ned Purdon, from misery freed,

Who long was a bookseller’s hack.

He led such a damnable life in this world

I don’t think he’ll wish to come back.”


Offering information and best regards

ACDC is a resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu