January News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 23-01

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Drovers Vol. 150, No. 1

Congratulations to the U.S.-based livestock magazine, Drovers, on reaching a spectacularly-rare 150th anniversary this month.

“We celebrate the dramatic changes that transformed our industry into a modern, reliable source of high-quality protein for consumers around the world,” explained Editor Greg Henderson in the January 2023 issue. Drovers Journal was recognized as the first U.S. periodical devoted to livestock market news. Founder Harvey L. Goodall first published it “on the bricks” in the Union Stock Yards, Chicago, Illinois, on January 11, 1873. The ACDC collection contains more than 100 Drovers articles (1975 to date) about communications related to livestock. We are pleased to add anniversary news items – and other articles during the years ahead.

“Generations of Drovers editors and publishers have successfully embraced the evolution of information gathering and dissemination from its slow, cumbersome beginnings with Goodall to our modern magazine and digital platforms,” Editor Henderson observed.


“Growing hesitancy” among rural parents about COVID-19 vaccine for their children

We are adding to the ACDC collection a 2022 article in PLOS ONE about attitudes and beliefs of parents in rural Colorado. Research team members used a brief online demographic survey and in-depth qualitative interviews. Findings prompted them to report: “The growing vaccine hesitancy among parents has serious implications for disease eradication and future viral outbreaks.”

You can read the research article by open access here.


“Six rural news outlets trying to bridge the information divide”

Writing in Nieman Reports, Celeste Katz Marston recently described six local newsrooms “helping audiences better understand places sometimes dismissed as ‘flyover country’.” She described them briefly:

• The Daily Yonder https://dailyyonder.com
• Southerly https://southerlymag.org
• The News Reporter https://nrcolumbus.com
• High Country News https://www.hcn.org
• Ohio Valley ReSource https://ohiovalleyresource.org
• Mountain State Spotlight https://mountainstatespotlight.org

You can read more about them at the URLs shown above.


Antidotes against ecological forgetfulness

We recently added to the ACDC collection an essay in High Country News about how we can be good future ecological ancestors. We tend to forget most of what we see and experience in the natural world around us, noted author Jason Mark.

“Each of us can become, in our own modest way, an environmental storyteller, passing down the oral histories of the places we inherited,” he observed (e.g., epic vistas, the feeling of wind in the face, the forest’s mossy scent, the cheep of chickadees, disappearing red-winged blackbirds). His prescription: “Be outside as much as you can. Bear witness. Make a record. Pass it on.”

You can read the brief essay here.


Troubled landscape about ethics in rural health care organizations

We are adding to the ACDC collection a 2011 article that reveals a troubled landscape in the realm of ethical dilemmas related to rural healthcare. A discussion in the American Medical Association Journal of Ethics painted this picture:
• Ethics committees are less prevalent in rural hospitals, they do not fulfill the typical role and they are seldom used.
• Health care personnel in rural areas do not see bioethics analysis as applicable to the problems they face.
• A lack of consensus about what constitutes ethical behavior leads to hesitancy and inaction.

You can read the discussion here.


Communicator events approaching soon

Here are plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

February 5-6, 2023
National Agricultural Communications Symposium (NACS) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Information: https://piecenter.com/nacs-2

April 19-23, 2023
32nd Annual Conference of the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) in Boise, Idaho. Information: https://conference.sej.org

April 25-27, 2023
Annual meeting of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association (TOCA) in Portland, Maine. Information: https://www.toca.org/toca-annual-meeting

April 26-28, 2023
“Next2Now: Tap into the Future Today.” Conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in St. Louis, Missouri.
Information: https://www.nama.org/2023-agri-marketing-conference.html

April 26-29, 2023
Conference of the International Agricultural and Extension Education Association (IAEE) in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Information: https://aiaee.org/2023conference

June 4-6, 2023
“Putting the Spotlight on Communications.” 2023 Institute of the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Portland, Maine.
Information: CCA Institute | Cooperative Communicators Association

June 11-13, 2023
Conference of the Association for Communication Excellence (ACE) in Ashville, North Carolina. Information: https://aceweb.org/2023conference

June 13-15, 2023
Annual meeting of the Agricultural Relations Council (ARC) in Des Moines, Iowa. Information: https://agrelationscouncil.org

Oh, the complexities of life

We close this issue of ACDC News with a comforting piece of traditional Irish wisdom:

“Leave the flurry
To the masses;
Take your time
And shine your glasses.”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

December News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 22-12

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Hybrid food shopping: Transforming the food retail landscape

A recent survey by FMI Food Industry Association explored attitudes and behaviors of the hybrid shoppers – those who grocery shop both in-store and online.

Findings suggested that expanded hybrid shopping “presents retailers with a variety of exciting opportunities to better engage with consumers by improving and streamlining the overall shopping experience.”

You can read this summary by open access here.


The trouble with ‘quiet advocacy’ about climate change

“While journalists in small, rural communities are known to actively advocate on issues of the common good, there has been little investigation of local media advocacy on climate change in rural Australia.” So reported a research team in a 2022 issue of Media, Culture and Society. Interviews with journalists at selected rural and regional newspapers revealed reluctance to engage in overt advocacy practices and thought leadership on climate change in their communities. Findings also shed light on reasons and prompted suggestions.

You can read the abstract and learn how to gain full-text access here.


How to inoculate communities against extremism

“Amid rising political tensions, one strategy can inoculate communities against anti-government ideologies,” reporter Sarah Trent indicated in a recent issue of High Country News. She described a case example involving public land management in an eastern Oregon county. Inclusive collaboration was the key to overcoming initial distrust between conservation and agriculture communities in Harney County.

“Every opportunity we have to bring people together across our divisions, to understand one another, to work together, to see and cultivate community – those are important, and they’re especially important right now.”

You can read the article here.


New approaches to the rural grocery store

We recently added several U.S. case examples which author Emily Rappleye described in a 2021 article from Rural Business. They came from Rial Carver, program manager for the Rural Grocery Initiative and Kansas Healthy Food Initiative.

“The good news is a grocery store closure doesn’t have to be the end of the story” in the wellbeing of rural communities.

You can read the article here.


Constraints facing farm women in adapting to climate change

The International Journal of Economic Plants included a research article that identified three major constraints facing farm women of northern India in adapting to climate change. Researchers A. Pandey and P. Arya interviewed a random sample of 280 farm women in eight villages of the Bikaner district of Rajasthan.

Findings revealed three types of major constraints:
1. Inadequate knowledge of climate change, adaptation measures and access to weather forecasting technology
2. Lack of training programs about this challenge
3. Lack of knowledge about government policies/programs and poor extension services related to climate change

You can read the article here.


Communicator events approaching soon

Here are plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

February 5-6, 2023
National Agricultural Communications Symposium (NACS) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Information: https://piecenter.com/nacs-2

April 19-23, 2023
32nd Annual Conference of the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) in Boise, Idaho. Information: https://conference.sej.org

April 25-27, 2023
Annual meeting of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association (TOCA) in Portland, Maine. Information: https://www.toca.org/toca-annual-meeting

April 26-28, 2023
“Next2Now: Tap into the Future Today.” Conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in St. Louis, Missouri.
Information: https://www.nama.org/2023-agri-marketing-conference.html

April 26-29, 2023
Conference of the International Agricultural and Extension Education Association (IAEE) in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Information: https://aiaee.org/2023conference

June 4-6, 2023
“Putting the Spotlight on Communications.” 2023 Institute of the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Portland, Maine.
Information: https://www.communicators.coop/professional-development/cca-institute/

June 11-13, 2023
Conference of the Association for Communication Excellence (ACE) in Ashville, North Carolina. Information: https://aceweb.org/2023conference

June 13-15, 2023
Annual meeting of the Agricultural Relations Council (ARC) in Des Moines, Iowa. Information: https://agrelationscouncil.org


Five year-end tips for living

We close this issue of ACDC News with some Old Farmer’s Advice:

Live simply, love generously, care deeply, speak kindly, and enjoy the ride.

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

November News and Research from the ACDC – Issue 22-11

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Tips for navigating science in the media

“With every trending scientific topic and the social media conversation that follows, it’s increasingly difficult to sift fact from fiction.” So reported the International Food Information Council in an article we added recently to the ACDC collection. Author Marisa Paipongna offered five tips for doing so:
• Be careful with clickbait
• Study the studies
• Know the lingo
• Take a deeper dive
• Beware of bias

You can read it here.


New research in the second 2022 issue of Journal of Applied Communications

“Foreseen demands for up-and-coming science communicators and recommendations for science communication training programs”

“Reporting a rural reality: A case study of an agricultural newspaper’s series on the rural opioid epidemic”

“Reporting on vital agricultural news in Ireland: A comparison between mainstream print media and the farming press”

“A scarcity of biospheric values in local and regional reporting of water issues: Media coverage in the Floridan aquifer region”

“Conservation in the news: Comparing news coverage of nutrient reduction in agricultural and non-agricultural news outlets in Iowa”

You can read these articles by open access here.


Five-year trends of how farmers buy online

That title introduces a brief 2022 research summary we are adding to the ACDC collection. It is part of an annual survey project from Farm Journal. The email study (conducted since 2018) asked farmers to report about how they buy the crop inputs they need. For example:
• Do you currently buy any of your crop inputs online?
• (For those who don’t buy online) Why?
• For the 2022 crop, what products did you buy online?
• For the 2023 crop, what products do you plan to buy online?
• What factors are important when you consider buying crop inputs?

You can read the summary here.


Dairy farmers, their veterinarians and prudent use of antimicrobials

Antibiotics journal recently published an article about how values and risk perceptions shape attitudes of Canadian dairy farmers toward prudent use of antimicrobials. Authors noted how antimicrobial resistance (AMU) is an important challenge to public health. They used an online survey among dairy farmers in Ontario and Atlantic Canada to assess farmers’ personal values, decision-making process, attitudes toward AMU reduction, and awareness of AMU. Factor analysis identified four groups of factors related to knowledge, risk perception, and emotional states among respondents. A logistic regression model identified variables associated with the probability of disagreeing with the need to increase promotion of responsible AMU in the dairy industry.

Findings provided guidance for using promising approaches to encourage and achieve prudent AMU. Among them were recommendations to develop (with veterinarians) protocols that involve more input from farmers.

You can read the article by open access here.


Movement towards transparency on European farm subsidies

“Bursting the ‘Brussels bubble’” is the title of a 2013 article we identified recently in the journal, Ethical space: The International Journal of Communication Ethics. Author Alana Mann described efforts of Farmsubsidy.org. It is a network of journalists, researchers, activists, and data analysists working together to make the European Union subsidy system more transparent. They are “pressuring the governments of member states to reveal the ‘subsidy millionaires’ who are benefiting from a system designed to assist small farmers.”

“In a democratic public sphere, the role of civil society organizations can be enhanced through targeted cooperative communication projects supported by transnational media structures that inform the public extensively about political policy, decision-making and governance.”

You can read the article here.


How to keep young people in the farming sector

Non-monetary benefits are as important as monetary benefits, according to a 2022 research report in PLOS ONE by researchers Para Jansuwan and Kerstin K. Zander. Using path analysis, they investigated which physical and psychological factors affected decisions of young farmers in Thailand to pursue three types of farming. Types included: (1) full-time profit-oriented rice farming, (2) full-time multi-functional farming in innovative mixed or organic production systems, or (3) part-time farming where young farmers worked off-farm and farmed outside regular working hours.

Young farmers choosing to pursue multifunctional farming had higher incomes. They also applied sophisticated technologies more often and farmed more sustainably than those choosing the other types of farming.

You can read the article by open access here. It stirs thinking about how to encourage young people to consider living and working in rural communities, wherever.


Communicator events approaching soon

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

November 16-18, 2022
“Providing Choice Information for Agriculture.” National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB) annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention

February 5-6, 2023
National Agricultural Communications Symposium (NACS) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Information: https://piecenter.com/nacs-2

April 19-23, 2023
32nd Annual Conference of the Society of Environmental Journalists (SEJ) in Boise, Idaho. Information: https://conference.sej.org

April 25-27, 2023
Annual meeting of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association (TOCA) in Portland, Maine. Information: https://www.toca.org/toca-annual-meeting

April 26-28, 2023
“Next2Now: Tap into the Future Today.” Conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in St. Louis, Missouri.
Information: https://www.nama.org/2023-agri-marketing-conference.html

April 26-29, 2023
Conference of the International Agricultural and Extension Education Association (IAEE) in Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Information: https://aiaee.org/2023conference


At Thanksgiving

During this season of thanks for harvests, we close the November issue of ACDC News with a limerick posted by D. Wallace Peach:

A turkey who drank and gobbled
Indulged ‘til his red waddle bobbled.
He tried a straight strut
And he trotted well, but
In the end, that old turkey just wobbled.

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

October News and Research from the ACDC – Issue 22-10

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“Collaboration, not fighting, is what the rural West is really about”

This perspective on rural communicating in the contemporary American West came to our attention recently. University of Oregon faculty member Steven Beda shared it in a 2018 commentary published by The Conversation news service. He explained that he studies the rural Northwest and has “spent a fair amount of time talking with loggers, miners, fishermen and ranchers…”

This is the sentiment he reported hearing often: “Whatever hardships contemporary rural life may pose – and there are many – it’s their love of the land and desire to protect it that keeps them put.” He acknowledged that many ranchers, loggers, and miners have problems with federal bureaucrats and environmental organizations. But “most rural people are committed to bringing about a more amicable future.”

You can read the commentary here.


How free press in nations fits with environment-friendly policy

An international analysis recently addressed this relationship. Researchers Inma Martinez-Zarzoso and Jennifer Phillips investigated it with a sample of OECD and BRHCS countries, plus a global sample of 82 countries. They used data across the period 1994-2015.

Results indicated that lack of press freedom is negatively correlated with stringency of environmental policies.

You can read this 2020 research report in Environment and Development Economics via Cambridge University Press here.


Acceptance of cultured meat in 10 countries

The journal, Appetite, recently published an article that described results of research about acceptance of cultured meat in 10 countries (Australia, China, England, France, Germany, Mexico, South Africa, Spain, Sweden and the United States). Swiss researchers Michael Siegrist and Christina Hartmann found that trust in the food industry, food neophobia, and food disgust sensitivity influenced the acceptance in almost all countries. However, one-way analysis of variance identified significant differences across countries. For example:

• The lowest level of acceptance was observed in France
• Acceptance was also relatively low in Germany and the United States
• Relatively high levels of acceptance were observed in Mexico, South Africa, England and Spain

You can read the article by open access here.


When authoritarian regimes crack down on media coverage of rural social movements

We recently added an article in the Journal of Peasant Studies which explored an ongoing transformation of authoritarian populism that has reduced the space for rural collective action. Authors interviewed Cambodian journalists who lost their jobs regarding a crackdown on the press, civil society, and opposition in the lead-up to the 2018 national election.

Researchers noted from their findings that “democratization is not a predetermined linear pathway, but a process of shifting of openings and closings that can just as easily slide deeper into authoritarianism.”

You can read the article by open access here.


Labeling to help reduce excess intake of energy, sugars, salt, and saturated fat

We have added to the ACDC collection a 2021 article about proposals being advanced in Europe for front-of-pack labeling to help consumers side-step obesity and related non-communicable diseases. It appeared in the journal, Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, and was written by the Scientific Board of the Italian Society of Human Nutrition.

Authors examined strengths and weaknesses of two proposals for adding a front-of-page label to the mandatory nutrition information on the back of the package. Both would be intended to “fight malnutrition by excess.”

You can read the article here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

October 21-25, 2022
“ScienceWriters 2022.” Meeting of the National Association of Science Writers (NASW) in Memphis, Tennessee.
Information: https://www.nasw.org/events/sciencewriters-2022-memphis/

November 2-3, 2022
“Level Up: Investing in Yourself and your Career.” Fall virtual conference of the Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences (ACE). Two afternoon zoom sessions feature some leading experts in navigating the job market in the digital age, developing your personal brand, and improving your executive presence.
Information: https://aceweb.org

November 16-18, 2022
“Providing Choice Information for Agriculture.” National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB) annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention


Happiness to you

We close this issue of ACDC News with an Irish blessing:

May brooks and trees and singing hills
Join in the chorus, too –
And every gentle wind that blows
Send happiness to you.

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

September News and Research from the ACDC – Issue 22-09

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Addressing fraudulent pesticides in the agrifood sector

We are adding to the ACDC collection a 2022 article in Agronomy journal about farmer perceptions of fraudulent pesticides in Egypt. Factorial analysis of data from 394 farmers revealed several critical drivers related to buying fraudulent pesticides: beliefs, health and environmental risks, recognition of quality, price, and policies. Findings led the researchers to recommend these actions:
• Reinforce the extant pesticide laws and administration of regulations
• Increase public awareness of the consequences of fraudulent pesticide use
• Improve recognition behavior by detecting fraudulent pesticides with digital technologies among all stakeholders

We note that the pesticide issue extends well beyond one country. You can read the article by open access here.


“Down and Dirty” – A branding campaign among country-lifestyle teens in Virginia

A campaign to assess attitudes and inform teens in Virginia about the risks of chewing tobacco showed results in an article we identified recently in Health Education and Behavior. Youths who “live and breathe country lifestyles” got special attention in this campaign, which involved traditional, digital, and social media. A total of 1,264 13- to 18-year-olds were recruited as participants.

Three waves of attitude assessment during the campaign revealed greater odds of strong attitudes against chew during Waves 2 and 3, compared with Wave 1. Results also indicated that odds of chew use were lower for these high-risk, country-engaged teens at later points of the campaign.

You can read the article by open access here.


Exploring disconnects between cooperatives and their members

Agricultural cooperatives must invest in a mixed strategy of communication channels to reach all profiles and preferences of their members. That advice came from the report of a literature review published earlier this year in the International Journal on Food System Dynamics. Authors searched for empirical articles in five international databases. Findings suggested that “agricultural cooperatives are slow to incorporate more diverse and effective means of communication to reach their varied audiences. … Inconsistent and ineffective communication between agricultural cooperatives and their members can create a disconnect ….”

You can read the article here.


Freedom within a cage

A 2021 article in BMJ Global Health examined how patriarchal gender norms limit women’s use of mobile phones in rural central India. Authors noted that India has one of the highest gender gaps in mobile phone access in the world. Their study focused on a sample of young married women in rural Madhya Pradesh. Findings revealed that phone use among these women was rarely constrained by overt gatekeeping. However, it was limited in ways such as:
• Narrow range of socially acceptable uses for women, compared with men
• Dependence on men for phone ownership
• Lower proximity to phones
• Poorer functionality of women’s phones
• Limited digital skills
• Constraints in time available to use phones.

You can read the article by open access here.


Case study of farmers as drivers of innovation

“Farmers are often overlooked and undervalued as sources of information, but can be powerful drivers of ingenuity and development.” A team of researchers at the University of Western Australia led with this observation in a 2022 research report published in Prometheus.

As a case example, team members evaluated historical developments in the Australian subterranean clover seed production industry. They identified lessons for agricultural innovation in the future and concluded: “Harnessing the creative power of farmers has potential to accelerate agricultural innovation and contribute to solving the considerable challenges facing global agriculture.”

You can read the case study here.


Welcome to our new ACDC associate

We are delighted to welcome Precious Olalere as new graduate assistant in the Agricultural Communications Documentation Center. She joined us during mid-August with a part-time appointment as she undertakes her graduate studies in the School of Information Sciences at the University of Illinois.

Precious earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Library and Information Science from the University of Ilorin, a federal government-owned university in western Nigeria. She brings research and analytic software experience from Scholars Academy and the Nigerian Stored Products Research Institute (NSPRI) Library.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

September 21-22, 2022
Professional Development Workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Information: https://communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops/

September 22, 2022
“Usage of satellite imagery in agricultural journalism.” Online workshop via Zoom, European Network of Agricultural Journalists (ENAJ). Presenter Jan Labohý is chief executive officer of World from Space.
Information: https://enaj.eu/usage-of-satellite-imagery-in-agricultural-journalism/

October 10-12, 2022
“Cultivating. Connecting.” Fall conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Information: https://nama.org/2022-fall-conference.html

October 13, 2022
Annual Harvest Service and Lunch, British Guild of Agricultural Journalists, in London, England. Information: https://www.gaj.org.uk/harvest-service-and-lunch

October 21-25, 2022
“ScienceWriters 2022.” Meeting of the National Association of Science Writers
(NASW) in Memphis, Tennessee.
Information: https://www.nasw.org/events/sciencewriters-2022-memphis/

November 16-18, 2022
“Providing Choice Information for Agriculture,” National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB) annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention


When you gain lots of influence

We close this issue of ACDC News with a piece of Old Farmer’s Advice which associate Paul Hixson shared with us:

“If you get to thinking you’re a person of some influence, try ordering somebody else’s dog around.”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is an open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

August News and Research from the ACDC – Issue 22-08

Click here for a printer-friendly PDF of this issue


How free press in nations fits with environment-friendly policy

An international analysis recently addressed this relationship. Researchers Inma Martinez-Zarzoso and Jennifer Phillips investigated it with a global sampling of countries. They used data across the period 1994-2015.

Results indicated that lack of press freedom is negatively correlated with stringency of environmental policies.

You can read this 2020 research report in Environment and Development Economics by open access via Cambridge University Press here.


“The dangers of big data extend to farming”

We are adding a 2022 article of that title to the ACDC collection. Author Kelly Bronson of the University of Ottawa, Canada, noted in a June issue of The Conversation that scholars and activists have spent years exposing dangerous effects of big data practices on individual privacy and civil liberties.

However, she suggested, agricultural data are likely to have far-reaching detrimental environmental and social impacts. She cited examples and proposed that, beyond data analysis and infrastructure, digital democracy calls for a fundamental redistribution of decision-making power from a small number of corporate stakeholders to a wider group of citizens who can help answer questions such as: What kind of food system do we want? Which farming techniques and technologies will help us get there?

You can read this article here.


Disconnect between what consumers say about fresh produce – and what they eat

Findings of a March 2022 national survey by Dole Food Company indicated that almost half of adult Americans mostly ignore the benefits of eating fresh fruits and vegetables, despite a widespread acceptance as essential to the health of their families. For example:

• 73% agreed that fruits and vegetables are a healthy choice for their families
• 68% said they think fruits and vegetables taste great
• 51% said they associate eating more produce with positively impacting the environment

However, almost half (48%) said they think the general public is still ignorant about the health and environmental impacts of fresh produce.

You can read a brief summary about the survey here.


Smallholder farmers in Pakistan at the frontlines of COVID-19

An analysis from the early period of COVID-19 sheds light on how these farmers viewed COVID-19, how it challenged them, and what they thought about government lockdown strategies. Researcher Muhammad Ammad Khan conducted research among 384 smallholder farmers in Punjab province. Results revealed:
• The vast majority of respondents were highly aware of the disease
• They had positive attitudes toward the government lockdown strategy
• Some were facing great challenges in access to farm inputs, unavailability of farm laborers, high prices, and selling their farm produce

You can read the 2022 article in the Journal of Rural and Community Development here.


How 18 million Americans could move into rural areas – without leaving home

“About 45 million Americans – 14% of the nation’s inhabitants – are currently classified as living in rural areas. That number could jump to 64 million – an increase of nearly 40% – without anyone moving into a new home.” So reported Devon Brenner and Jesse Longhurst in a 2021 report from The Conversation news service. They were referring to a government proposal to move everyone who lives in places with 50,000 to 100,000 from urban to rural life.

“Making the proposed change would mean 144 areas with populations between 50,000 and 100,000, and the 251 counties they occupy, would no longer be classified as ‘metropolitan,’ but rather as ‘micropolitan’ – and therefore effectively rural.”

In this brief article, authors described some possible social and economic implications of the proposal.

You can read it here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

September 18-21, 2022
Annual conference of the International Food, Wine, and Travel Writers Conference in St. Petersburg, Florida. Information: https://ifwtwa.org/2022-ifwtwa-conference

September 21-22, 2022
Professional Development Workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.
Information: https://communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops/

September 22, 2022
“Usage of satellite imagery in agricultural journalism.” Online workshop via Zoom, European Network of Agricultural Journalists (ENAJ). Presenter Jan Labohý is chief executive officer of World from Space.
Information: https://enaj.eu/usage-of-satellite-imagery-in-agricultural-journalism/

October 10-12, 2022
“Cultivating. Connecting.” Fall conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Minneapolis, Minnesota.
Information: https://nama.org/2022-fall-conference.html

October 13, 2022
Annual Harvest Service and Lunch, British Guild of Agricultural Journalists, in London, England. Information: https://www.gaj.org.uk/harvest-service-and-lunch

October 21-25, 2022
“ScienceWriters 2022.” Meeting of the National Association of Science Writers
(NASW) in Memphis, Tennessee.
Information: https://www.nasw.org/events/sciencewriters-2022-memphis/

November 16-18, 2022
National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB). Annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention

“He can fix it”

We close this issue of ACDC News with a perspective from ever-alert associate John Otte. He called attention recently to something he heard from an acquaintance about special creativity found in many local rural communities.

This acquaintance recalled growing up where the proprietor of a fix-it shop maintained he could fix anything – except the crack of dawn and a broken heart.

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUCDocNews22-08. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

July News and Research from the ACDC – Issue 22-07

Click here for a printer-friendly PDF of this issue


Rural youths in India turn into citizen journalists

“At a time when the International Human Rights Day was being celebrated with much excitement across the world, a silent story of change was being scripted in the community hall” of a small town in northern India. So began a recent article in The Hans India. It explained how rural youths were telling government officials about challenges plaguing their villages. As citizen journalists, they discussed issues such as child marriage, problems of dowry, gender discrimination, wearing Ghoonghat Pratha, suffering from hunger, and casteism.

The district collector commended students for advancing the important role of media as a pillar of democracy and for helping build nationhood.

 

You can read the article online here.


A call:  Let’s expand constructive efforts to address destructive social conflicts

Recently we added to the ACDC collection a 13-page road map to address the “destructive-conflict-as-usual way in which the U.S. and so many other societies now commonly address complex, large-scale, intractable conflicts…”

It was written in 2019 by Guy Burgess and Heidi Burgess of the Conflict Information Consortium, University of Colorado. They argue that such conflicts represent the single greatest threat to humanity and the planet. They drafted this statement to describe the challenge and invite suggestions for a broad collaborative effort to manage conflict in constructive rather than destructive ways.

You can read the statement here.


“There’s a lot the Postal Service can do”

A new document in ACDC features a 202l interview with Lisa Graves, political activist and senior fellow of the Center for Media and Democracy. She emphasized the unique, valuable role of the U.S. Postal Service and identified several ways in which it might be more fully engaged in public service. Among the ideas she suggested:

  • A hub for internet access
  • A charging station for electric cars
  • An informal gathering place in local communities
  • Banking services for underbanked communities

 

You can read this interview here.


 How consumers view climate change these days

“Concern about climate change is real for consumers surveyed recently by The Packer,” a news enterprise serving the food industry. Among the respondents, 87% rated addressing climate change as important (25%), very important (24%) or extremely important (38%) to their overall sustainability priorities.

Here are the top five reasons they cited:

  • Combat climate change
  • Improve human health
  • Reduce food waste
  • It’s the responsible thing to do
  • Reduce air pollution

You can read a summary of the survey findings here.


A lingering environmental case study of not listening

“The people of Flint are still suffering,” read the headline of a January 2022 article we have added in ACDC. The article features an interview with investigative reporter Jordan Chariton of the independent news network Status Coup News. This conversation involves a controversial decision in 2014 to switch the source of drinking water in Flint, Michigan – and follow-up disputes about continuing effects of heavy metal poisoning on residents.

Reporter Chariton said “…there’s been a lot of …’we hear you and we’re going to do everything for you.’ But if you talk to the people of Flint, they are still screaming for help.”  He also observed that “the local media of Michigan has essentially continued this narrative that the water is fine now, and let’s move on.”

You can read the interview here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

July 16-20, 2022

“On point.” Agricultural Media Summit in Raleigh, North Carolina. Sponsored by the American Agricultural Editors’ Association (AAEA), Connectiv Agri-Media Committee, and Livestock Publications Council (LPC).

Information: https://agmediasummit.com

July 20-24, 2022

International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors. Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. Information: https://iswne.org/annual_conferences

September 21-22, 2022

Professional Development Workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Information: https://www.communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops/

October 10-12, 2022

National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA). Fall conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Information: https://web.nama.org/events/2022-fall-conference-402/details

November 16-18, 2022

National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB). Annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention


Dealing with life

We close this issue of ACDC News with a piece of advice about observing and dealing with life. It comes from Jerry Apps in his 1998 book, Rural Wisdom.

“Remember to listen for the whispers and look in the shadows.”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

ACDC News – Issue 22-06

Click here for a printer-friendly pdf of this issue.


“Media need to treat every day as Earth Day”

The climate crisis is an emergency that demands urgent, sustained attention and action – not a fleeting mention once a month, according to a recent article by Julie Hollar. She was writing on the website of Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting (FAIR), a media watchdog group based in New York City.

“Any further delay in concerted anticipatory global action on adaptation and mitigation will miss a brief and rapidly closing window of opportunity to secure a livable and sustainable future for all.”

 

You can read the thought piece here.


First of the 2022 articles in JAC

Four new research articles appear in the first 2022 issue of the Journal of Applied Communications.  You can read them online, along with four papers delivered at the most recent conference of the Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences (ACE).

  • “Persuasive effects of metaphors regarding gene-editing in agriculture” by Nellie Hill, Courtney Meyers, Nan Li, David L. Doerfert, and Venugopal Mendu
  • “Characteristics and motivational factors of American equine journalists” by Zoe B. Bowden, Ricky W. Telg, and Lisa K. Lundy
  • “Influence of message theme on consumer perceptions of lab grown meat” by Kellie Kubacak, Courtney Meyers, Hannah L. Ford, Nan Li, and Lindsay Kennedy
  • “Labs and landscapes virtual reality: Student-created forest conservation tours for informal public engagement” by Whitney Stone, Jamie Loizzo, Jacqueline Aenlle, and Peyton Beattie

 

You can read the articles here.


Potential of social network analysis: A case study involving organic food

We recently added a research report about the potential value of social network analysis in understanding consumer perceptions of organic food. An international team of researchers compared the results of 14 studies carried out by using standard research methods with those based on 344,233 posts by 73,380 Instagram users.

Both approaches identified four key areas as factors important to consumers buying organic food:  (1) health consciousness, (2) ecological motives, (3) taste, and (4) hedonism.

 

You can read the journal article by open access for individual use here.


Recognizing a new collection

Sincere thanks to retired communicator Chris Scherer for alerting us to his collection of professional books. Copies of some are already in the University of Illinois Library. However, more than half involve communications related to agriculture and we had not been aware of them. So we are reviewing the books we don’t have and preparing citations for the ACDC database and search system. As a result, online visitors will soon be able to identify and gain access to detailed agricultural communications information otherwise difficult to find.

Books in the new Chris Scherer Collection feature excellent information for professional journalists and communicators as well as researchers, students and others. Subjects range across writing, layout and design, trends in advertising and public relations, and the history of women in journalism.

 

Check with ACDC Associate Jim Evans if you would like to learn more about this collection – or if you have agricultural journalism and communications materials for which you might like to find a home.


Record-high worry about hunger

“One year after the coronavirus pandemic upended Americans’ lives and caused an economic crisis, worry about hunger and homelessness in the country eclipsed concerns about 13 other national issues for the first time. The 55% of U.S. adults who say they personally worry ‘a great deal’ about these consequences of poverty marks an eight-percentage-point increase since last year and the highest in 20 years of measurement.”

 

We recently added this Gallup news item to the ACDC collection. You can read further details about recent results of annual Gallup Poll research here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

June 21-23, 2022

Agricultural Relations Council (ARC). Annual meeting in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Information: https://agrelationscouncil.org

June 27-July 3, 2022

“Smarter farming and food production for green and sustainable growth.” 2022 World Congress of the International Federation of Agricultural Journalists (IFAJ) in Vingsted, Denmark. Hosted by the Danish Food and Agricultural Journalists.

Information:  https://ifaj2020.dk

July 16-20, 2022

“On point.” Agricultural Media Summit in Raleigh, North Carolina. Sponsored by the American Agricultural Editors’ Association (AAEA), Connectiv Agri-Media Committee, and Livestock Publications Council (LPC).

Information: https://agmediasummit.co

July 20-24, 2022

International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors. Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. Information: https://iswne.org/annual_conferences

September 21-22, 2022

Professional Development Workshop sponsored by the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma.

Information: communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops/

October 10-12, 2022

National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA). Fall conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Information: https://web.nama.org/events/2022-fall-conference-402/details

November 16-18, 2022

National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB). Annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention


From misery freed

We close this issue of ACDC News with an epitaph by Oliver Goldsmith:

“Here lies poor Ned Purdon, from misery freed,

Who long was a bookseller’s hack.

He led such a damnable life in this world

I don’t think he’ll wish to come back.”


Offering information and best regards

ACDC is a resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

ACDC News – Issue 22-05

Click here for a Printer-Friendy-PDF of this issue


Rural worries about new Postal Service delays

We have added a news item from Daily Yonder addressing the possible impacts of recent-approved delays in mail shipments by the U.S. Postal Service.

Since early October, the USPS has been authorized to delay shipments of first-class mail – letters, bills, tax documents, and the like. Deliveries that “normally took three days now take upward of five days.”  The change helps address the rising expenses of the Postal Service. However, author Kristi Eaton reports, “Advocates and researchers who study the postal system continue to worry about the effect the changes will have on rural America.”

 

You can read more about this rural information issue here.


Checking her career interest in full-time ag freelancing

Agricultural journalist Sabrina Halvorson “decided to spend a year as a full-time freelancer to see what I could learn from that.” Since the 1990s she had freelanced on the side of a full-time job. As her year ended recently, she reported on her experience to Agricultural Communicators Network/AAEA members in the ByLine newsletter. Among the freelancing tips she offered:

  • Don’t wear yourself out. “Work is only part of life.”
  • Find the spices (topics) you like.
  • Find someone to be your cheerleader

 

You can read her report, “Finding balance in freelancing,” here.


“Making the case for ugly produce”

How should the fresh produce industry communicate about off-shaped carrots and other vegetables? A report of this title in The Packer trade periodical addresses the question. Findings of new university research suggest the produce industry should avoid simply treating them as ugly, inferior food that should be worthless.

“Explaining the value of misshapen vegetables –that they are as healthful as their picture-perfect counterparts and buying them reduces food waste – could help improve sales of ‘ugly’ produce,” said senior study author Brian Roe.

 

You can read the report here.


Recent recognition in rural community journalism

A North Carolina family with seven decades of outstanding public service has received the 2021 Tom and Pat Gish Award. This award is sponsored by the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues based at the University of Kentucky.

Thompson-High family has owned the twice-weekly News Reporter in Whiteville, North Carolina, since 1938. Since then, it “has continued to show courage, integrity and tenacity by holding accountable local public officials – especially those in the criminal justice system – despite significant financial adversity, reader and advertiser boycotts, personal attacks and threats against family members’ lives, and taking smaller profits to better serve its readers, but always looking ahead.”

 

You can read more about this honored community journalism here.


Is there growth in gardening?

In this COVID era, “the seed aspect is definitely an angle that the business journalist should look at when reporting on this topic.” So advised Kenechi Anigbogu in a recent article from the National Center for Business Journalism. He offered several possible approaches for covering it in any part of the world:

  • Look at the seed retailers to examine trends they are noticing
  • Talk with a horticulturist based in your area of coverage
  • Check the rise of food prices because consumers may look to gardening as a means of beating inflation

 

You can read the article here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

June 6-9, 2022

“Culture, Color, Creativity.” Annual Institute of the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Information: https://www.communicators.coop/professional-development/cca-institute/

June 12-14, 2022

“Reimagined: ACE and all that jazz.” Annual conference of the Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences (ACE) in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://aceweb.org

June 21-23, 2022

Agricultural Relations Council (ARC). Annual meeting in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Information: https://agrelationscouncil.org

June 27-July 3, 2022

“Smarter farming and food production for green and sustainable growth.” 2022 World Congress of the International Federation of Agricultural Journalists (IFAJ) in Vingsted, Denmark. Hosted by the Danish Food and Agricultural Journalists.

Information:  https://ifaj2020.dk

July 16-20, 2022

“On point.” Agricultural Media Summit in Raleigh, North Carolina. Sponsored by the American Agricultural Editors’ Association (AAEA), Connectiv Agri-Media Committee, and Livestock Publications Council (LPC).

Information: ­­­https://agme­­­­­­­diasummit.com

July 20-24, 2022

International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors. Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. Information: https://iswne.org/annual_conferences

October 10-12, 2022

National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA). Fall conference in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Information: https://web.nama.org/events/2022-fall-conference-402/details

November 16-18, 2022

National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB). Annual conference in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention


An Irish blessing

We close this issue of ACDC News with an Irish blessing:

“May the face of every good news

And the back of every bad news

Be towards us.”


Offering information and best regards

ACDC is a resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcomed to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

 

 

 

ACDC News – Issue 22-04

Click here for a printer-friendly pdf of this issue


Journals and journal editors – guardians of the agricultural sciences

This enduringly important perspective appeared in a 1982 Rural Sociology article we added recently to the ACDC collection. Researchers William Lacy and Lawrence Busch used national surveys of agricultural journal editors and agricultural scientists in 13 disciplines to examine the role of professional journals in research. Survey results also revealed the criteria that authors and editors use in submitting and selecting articles for publication.  Findings reinforced the vital roles that editors play in the agricultural research process.

 

You can read the article abstract here via ResearchGate or request the full article pdf.


No Till Farmer magazine recently celebrated a “triple crown”

Mike Lessiter, president of Lessiter Media, reports that the celebration featured:

  • 60 years since the first commercial no-till plots in Kentucky
  • 50 years since his father, Frank Lessiter, launched this magazine to serve information needs of farmers who use no-till and strip-till methods
  • 30 years since the first National No-Tillage Conference

The celebration also featured a “Museum of No-Till History” –  2,064 square feet of vertical displays at the recent conference in Louisville, Kentucky.  Displays included more than 500 photos, 40 factoids and 50-plus charts and illustrations. “Once we were looking for it, every place we turned yielded more historical discoveries…”

 

You can view the Museum boards here.


Seven biggest ethical issues facing the agricultural industry

We are adding to the ACDC collection a 2019 posting in the ethics hotline, Ethical Advocate. It identified seven ways to improve agricultural ethics in the U.S. They addressed issues such as safety of food, treatment of animals and use of chemicals.

One cited issue involved the sharing of information – for instance, warning a fellow farmer of a parasite or pest issue versus letting a problem ruin a farm. “Sharing information to help each other helps the entire industry and the world as a whole.”

 

You can read the brief article here.


Required food labeling information – not all offered online

Findings of a recent research report in Public Health Nutrition indicated that information provided regularly to consumers in conventional food retail settings in the USA is not being uniformly provided online. For example, required details about nutrition and allergens were present, conspicuous and legible for an average of only 36.5% of the food and drink products surveyed. Researchers concluded that “at a minimum, the entire required nutritional information panel should be made conspicuously and immediately visible and legible under ordinary purchase conditions online.”

 

You can read the 2021 article here.


Update on what food is “natural”

The 2021 Food and Health Survey by the International Food Information Council (IFIC) showed that one-third of Americans regularly buy foods and beverages because they are labeled as “natural.”  Also, most Americans said they view a product labeled “all natural” as healthier than a product that is not, even if they have the same Nutrition Facts label.

“But does ‘natural’ really mean what we think it means?” IFIC explains that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) “…considers ‘natural’ to mean that nothing artificial or synthetic has been put into a food that wouldn’t be expected to be there.” The definition “is not meant to address food production, processing or manufacturing methods. Nor is it indicative of a food’s nutritional or health benefit.”

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) regulates meat, poultry and egg products – but not shell eggs. It considers a natural meat and poultry product as “containing no artificial ingredient or added color and is only minimally processed.”

The IFIC report suggests to food shoppers, “…remember that there is no formal definition for the term and head for the Nutrition Facts label for details about its healthfulness. Just because it’s ‘natural’ doesn’t mean it’s healthier.”

 

You can read the full article here.


Communicator events approaching

Uncertainties of the COVID-19 health issue continue to prompt flexible event planning. Here are plans of which we are aware, with contact information you can use for details.

June 6-9, 2022

“Culture, Color, Creativity” Annual Institute of the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Information: https://www.communicators.coop/professional-development/cca-institute/

June 12-14, 2022

“Reimagined: ACE all that jazz.” Annual conference of the Association for Communication Excellence in Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Life and Human Sciences (ACE) in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://aceweb.org

June 27-July 3, 2022

“Smarter farming and food production for green and sustainable growth.” 2022 World Congress of the International Federation of Agricultural Journalists (IFAJ) in Vingsted, Denmark. Hosted by the Danish Food and Agricultural Journalists.

Information:  https://ifaj2020.dk

July 16-20, 2022

“On point.” Agricultural Media Summit in Raleigh, North Carolina. Sponsored by the American Agricultural Editors’ Association (AAEA), Connectiv Agri-Media Committee, and Livestock Publications Council (LPC).

Information: https://agmediasummit.com


The most important part

We close this issue of ACDC News with a thought from Sallie Tisdale in “Travel guide to the end of life.”

“Few of us communicate really well. We think explaining ourselves is key, but listening is the most important part.”


 Offering information and best regards

ACDC is a resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu