May News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 24-05

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“Seven drivers of trust-earning transparency”

These validated principles come from the Center for Food Integrity (CFI). Participants examined them at a Transparency Summit in Chicago, Illinois, during November 2023. Drivers included:

• Motivation: Act in a manner that is ethical and consistent with stakeholder interests.
• Disclosure: Share all information publicly, both positive and negative.
• Stakeholder participation: Engage those interested in your activities or impact.
• Relevance: Share information stakeholders deem relevant.
• Clarity: Share information that is easily understood and easily obtained.
• Credibility: Have a history of operating with integrity.
• Accuracy: Share information that is truthful, objective, reliable and complete.

This article is not available by open access. Please invite our help at acdc@library.illinois.edu.


Digital divides still exist among rural, suburban, and urban American adults

A 2021 survey by Pew Research Center among U.S. adults revealed that rural Americans made large gains in adopting digital technology over the previous decade. They narrowed some digital gaps. “However, rural adults remain less likely than suburban adults to have home broadband and less likely than urban adults to own a smartphone, tablet computer or traditional computer.”

Seventy-two percent of rural adults reported having home broadband service in 2021, compared with 79 percent of suburban adults and 77 percent of urban adults. Rural service had risen nine percent since 2016. “…lack of reliable internet access has come to the forefront of discussions about navigating remote work and school during the coronavirus pandemic.”

You can read “Some digital divides persist between rural, urban and suburban America” by open access.


Celebrating 20 years of ZimmComm

Congratulations to Chuck and Cindy Zimmerman as they observe the 20th anniversary of their innovative ZimmComm enterprise, based in Florida.
“It was at the 2004 NAMA conference that we kicked off our new company, which was initially called ZimmComm New Media – but what was new then is now just called social media, a little thing that has made a deep impact on what we all do as marketers, journalists, and communicators in general.” It has charted new pathways for effective event reporting and information services involving agribusiness communications.

You can read more about this by open access in an April 22 report entitled “ZimmComm Celebrates 20th Anniversary.


How prepared are German pig farmers to prevent African swine fever?

A 2024 article in Porcine Health Management reported on research addressing that question. Results were encouraging. “The biosecurity check showed that on most farms, a high level of biosecurity had been implemented. … Overall, the farmers were well informed about ASF and had a realistic perception of their own biosecurity.”

Researchers suggested that current knowledge transfer and information should focus on building upon the farmers’ own motivation and expertise. Efforts should support the farmers’ efforts to put existing knowledge into practice.

You can read “Biosecurity measures for the prevention of African swine fever on German pig farms” by open access.


Special conflicts in ethics of rural health care

We are adding to the ACDC collection a chapter in the Handbook for rural health care ethics: a practical guide for professionals from Dartmouth College Press (2009). Chapter 7, written by Tom Townsend, featured “Ethics conflicts in rural communities: privacy and confidentiality.”

Townsend explored “ethical challenges involving privacy and confidentiality in rural health care relationships, due to overlapping relationships and familiarity with patients and communities.” He noted how the ethics issues within the patient-provider relationship change when “strangers at the bedside” rather than friends, neighbors or acquaintances are involved as health care providers. Several situation case studies in the chapter helped examine such ethical issues. A closing section offered suggestions about how to address ethical conflicts in confidentiality and privacy.

You can read “Ethics conflicts in rural communities: privacy and confidentiality” by open access.


Communicator events approaching

Here are event plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

June 2-4, 2024. “Center of Communication.” Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) Institute in Des Moines, Iowa. Information: https://www.communicators.coop/professional-development/cca-institute/

June 18-20, 2024. Annual meeting of the Agricultural Relations Council (ARC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Information: https://www.agrelationscouncil.org/agricultural-relations-council-annual-meeting/

June 18-23, 2024. Conference of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors (ISWNE) in Toronto, Canada.
Information: https://www.iswne.org/conferences/

June 20-24, 2024. “Communication and global human rights.” Annual conference of the International Communication Association (ICA) in Gold Coast, Australia. Information: https://www.icahdq.org/mpage/ica24/

June 23-25, 2024. “Big ideas start here.” Annual conference of the Association of Communication Excellence (ACE) in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Information: https://aceweb.org/ace-conference/


On speaking better

We close this issue of ACDC News with a Dutch proverb about communicating:

“It is better to speak sense occasionally than nonsense continually.”


Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

April News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 24-04

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News media in rural communities not covering local matters

Results of a 2019 Pew Research Center national survey indicated that only 41 percent of U.S. rural residents said their local news media mostly cover their areas, compared with 62 percent of urban residents. This gap is cited as “a concern raised by many journalism watchers following newsroom cutbacks and media consolidation.”

As a possible result, 69 percent of rural residents indicated their local news media do not have much influence.

You can read “For many rural residents in U.S., local news media mostly don’t cover…” by open access.


Participatory photography and thematic collages: pathways to adoption

A research team from the University of Reading (UK) collaborated recently with members of a women’s self-help group in India to explore this interactive approach to rural development. They used individual photo creativity and group discussion to understand more clearly the subjective motivations and social-cultural factors which influence adoption of zero budget natural farming. It emphasizes chemical-free inputs and regenerative farming technologies.

You can read “Thematic collages in participatory photography” by open access in the International Journal of Qualitative Methods.


Factors affecting trust in Chinese digital journalism

“Trust in online digital news has become a significant concern affecting social cohesion in China. Under the framework of folk theories, we interviewed urban and rural residents’ perceptions and imaginations of digital news credibility in China’s digital journalism environment.” So indicated the authors of this 2023 article in Media and Communication.

Among their findings:
• Digital media giants in China were used by both urban and rural residents.
• Skepticism of digital news accounted for only a tiny fraction of the reasons held by news avoiders.
• Urban and rural residents had similar perceptions about the impact of news forms, quality of information and individual stances on digital news.
• Rural residents showed uncertainty about the transparency of news production.
• News seekers were more likely to display herd behaviors, which may mislead their judgment of news credibility.
• News avoiders may refuse to consume news because of their distaste for China’s digital news atmosphere.

You can read “Factors affecting trust in Chinese digital journalism” by open access.


Farm-based causes and solutions for fruit and vegetable waste

A 2024 article in the International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability addressed this issue in Romania. Authors emphasized that farmers are “the most important stakeholders in minimizing fruit and vegetable waste in primary production, and any intervention must consider their attitudes and perspectives.” Results of a qualitative analysis process showed that farmers defined such waste as discarded produce, excluding items used for compost or animal feed. Three indirect causes of farm-based produce waste emerged:

• Consumers’ preference for supermarkets and perfectly-shaped fruits and vegetables
• Difficulties farmers face in accessing supermarkets
• Difficulties they face in marketing imperfect fruits and vegetables

Authors called for (a) inclusive food policies that prioritize local knowledge and (b) farmers to tailor solutions for reducing fruit and vegetable waste.

You can read “Causes and solutions for fruit and vegetable waste” by open access.


Marketing to the rural lifestyle audience

We are adding to the ACDC collection results of an analysis which focused on marketing to about 46 million U.S. residents living in rural places. Author Sara Steever, president of Paulsen marketing agency, reported findings about the characteristics, attitudes, activities, media preferences and purchase intent of rural residents who own land for self-fulfillment rather than profit.

She indicated that the findings can help marketers create specific content, develop new products and services, optimize their media investment, attract and retain customers and build brand loyalty.

You can read “Marketing to the rural lifestyle audience” by open access.


Communicator events approaching

Here are event plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

May 16-18, 2024. “Return to horse country.” Conference of American Horse Publications (AHP) in Lexington, Kentucky. Information: https://www.americanhorsepubs.org/ahp-annual-conference/

June 2-4, 2024. “Center of Communication.” Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) Institute in Des Moines, Iowa. Information: https://www.communicators.coop/professional-development/cca-institute/

June 18-20, 2024. Annual meeting of the Agricultural Relations Council (ARC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Information: https://www.agrelationscouncil.org/agricultural-relations-council-annual-meeting/

June 18-23, 2024. Conference of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors (ISWNE) in Toronto, Canada.
Information: https://www.iswne.org/conferences/

June 20-24, 2024. “Communication and global human rights.” Annual conference of the International Communication Association (ICA) in Gold Coast, Australia. Information: https://www.icahdq.org/mpage/ica24/

June 23-25, 2024. “Big ideas start here.” Annual conference of the Association of Communication Excellence (ACE) in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Information: https://aceweb.org/ace-conference/


Said of certain cattle thieves

As boosters of brevity, we close this issue of ACDC News with a concise, revealing euphemism about the fate of certain cattle thieves. It caught our eye in the book, Cow People, by J. Frank Dobie:

“They quit breathing.”


Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

March News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 24-03

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“Shattered papers and ‘ghosts’ without local news”

We are adding to the ACDC collection a revealing 2023 report by Al Cross about “what has happened to hundreds of newspapers that once covered small cities, towns and rural areas across America.”

Cross is director emeritus at the Institute for Rural Journalism, University of Kentucky. “They’ve become ‘ghost papers,’ he observed, “with either no local journalists remaining on staff or so few that the paper’s ability to provide critical news and information to residents in that community has been severely curtailed.”

His report documents this erosion during the past two decades. As well, he identifies new business models emerging in some small and mid-sized communities.

You can read “Rural mirages: Shattered papers and ‘ghosts’ without local news” by open access.


Effect of photographic style on trust in social media messaging

A 2023 article in First Monday journal explored the effect of photo aesthetics on trust and interest in social media accounts. Author Jennifer Golbeck surveyed 3,255 online respondents about dog care, using various styles of photographs.

“Subjects reported significantly higher trust in and more interest in following accounts that posted well-composed, well-lit, more professional photos as compared with accounts with more casual photos.”

You can read “Photo aesthetics as a factor in trust and interest assessments” by open access.


Comparing Australian public and farmer views

A 2024 issue of Ecological Economics includes an article about comparative rural-urban views on agricultural land use and management practices in Australia. Results of a survey identified three dimensions for attention:

• Issues related to animal welfare, greenhouse gas emissions and food safety
• Issues related to use of farm inputs
• Issues related to use of socially valuable assets for private profits

You can read “Comparing Australian public and farmer views on agricultural land use and management practices for sustainability” by open access.


Thanks for a new book featuring Irish Farmers Journal

Sincere thanks to Claire McCormack for providing a copy of Irish Farmers Journal: A History to the Agricultural Communications Documentation Center and University of Illinois Library. You may recall that Claire was the first Visiting Global Agricultural Journalist late last year here at the University of Illinois. She is a researcher in media work and agriculture at the School of Agriculture and Food Science at University College Dublin.

This new 280-page book traces a 76-year history of the biggest-selling farming publication across the islands of Ireland and Britain. Co-authors Mark Duncan and Paul Rouse have “told the story of a newspaper that is rooted in the evolution of Irish agriculture and a much wider societal transformation, with all that this means for the lives of the readers.”

We in ACDC know the rarity and value of such in-depth research about journalism and communications related to food and agriculture. As the authors noted, Irish Farmers Journal has both chronicled change and shaped it.


Promoting agricultural conservation on Facebook

A 2023 article in Sustainability Science provides insight on that timely challenge. Using Facebook ads, the research team tested farmer response to message themes related to four identities: Business, Hero, Science, and Steward. Findings suggested:

• Ads framed to address Business as a farmer identity were the most effective in obtaining farmer clicks
• However, ads using the Science or Steward frames engaged women most effectively
• Among younger respondents, the Hero ads received fewer clicks compared to the Business or Science ads

By open access, you can read “Promoting agricultural conservation on Facebook” in this article.


Communicator events approaching

Here are event plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

April 22-25, 2024
Conference of the Association for International Agricultural and Extension Education (AIAEE) at the University of Florida, Gainesville.
Information: https://www.aiaee.org/2024-Conference 

April 24-26, 2024
“Bright Horizons.” Conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://www.nama.org/bright_horizons.html

April 29-May 1, 2024
Annual meeting of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association (TOCA) in Las Vegas, Nevada. Information: https://www.toca.org/toca-events

May 16-18, 2024. “Return to horse country,” conference of American Horse Publications (AHP) in Lexington, Kentucky. Information: https://www.americanhorsepubs.org/2024-ahp-equine-media-conference/

June 2-4, 2024. “Center of Communication.” Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) Institute in Des Moines, Iowa. Information: https://www.communicators.coop/professional-development/cca-institute/

June 18-20, 2024. Annual meeting of the Agricultural Relations Council (ARC) in Cincinnati, Ohio. Information: https://www.agrelationscouncil.org/agricultural-relations-council-annual-meeting/

June 18-23, 2024. Conference of the International Society of Weekly Newspaper Editors (ISWNE) in Toronto, Canada.
Information: https://www.iswne.org/annual_conferences/june-18-23-2024-conference—toronto-canada/article_1faf8c14-95bf-11e9-b994-7fbdafce6984.html

June 20-24, 2024. “Communication and global human rights.” Annual conference of the International Communication Association (ICA) in Gold Coast, Australia. Information: https://www.icahdq.org/mpage/ica24/

June 23-25, 2024. “Big ideas start here.” Annual conference of the Association of Communication Excellence (ACE) in Salt Lake City, Utah.
Information: https://aceweb.org/ace-conference/


What should we do?

We close this issue of ACDC News with a senior Irish farmer’s view about going into the European Economic Community (EEC) during the early 1970s. It was reported in Irish Farmers Journal: A History (page 110) and perhaps reflects a broader, cautionary perspective on outcomes of decisions in life.

“Whatever we do, we will be sorry.”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

February News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 24-02

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Water scientists: trusted, but their advice may not be followed

A note of caution appeared in an article about the priorities people assign to various sources of information about water issues. Researcher Sadie Hundemer examined factors that affect residents’ perceived willingness to change their water beliefs based on information provided by scientists as well as by less-scientific institutions, such as media and interest groups. Her study involved 806 Florida and Georgia (USA) residents.

Results prompted her to suggest, “…while the words of scientists influence the public’s water beliefs, other information sources are also influential and can reduce the impact of scientists’ messages.”

You can read “Prioritization of scientific sources of water information” in this 2024 Journal of Applied Communications article by open access.


Congratulations to the new director, Institute for Rural Journalism

We are pleased to extend congratulations to Benjy Hamm as new director of the Institute of Rural Journalism and Community Issues, based at the University of Kentucky. He assumed that important responsibility in August, 2023.

Writing in The Rural Blog, he emphasized how “journalists and trusted news organizations are more important now than ever.”

You can read “Moving forward: New director’s thoughts…” by open access.


Are consumers ready to eat insect-fed poultry?

Results of recent research among Italian consumers revealed positive attitudes toward buying meat and eggs from insect-fed (IF) poultry. .

“Moreover, we find that food neophobia and entomophobia negatively affect Italian consumers’ attitude towards those products, while the trust in the role of
public authorities in securing food safety positively impacts on it. Also, consumers’ propensity towards sustainable food increases the likelihood of buying IF animal products.”

You can read “Back to the future: Are consumers ready…” in Future Foods by open access.


“…it is high time for the diffusion of sustainable agricultural practices…”

So concluded researchers in a 2024 issue of the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences. The team had examined use of pesticides in the Erode District, among the most predominant paddy rice regions of western Tamil Nadu, India. Probability sampling involved the communication network of farmers in 10 villages.

Among the findings and suggestions:
• “…surveyed farmers used excessive pesticides every day”
• The excess pesticide application could be largely attributed to lack of awareness about the ill effects of pesticides
• Local input dealers agricultural officers, and spray men were the significant informants regarding pesticide-related information
• Those sources should be included in the extension setup to promote and motivate farmers to use pesticides sustainably

You can read “Understanding the communication network of farmers…” by open access.


“I talk to producers like I’m a producer!”

We are adding to the ACDC collection an article in Advancements in Agricultural Development about how extension professionals view climate change and frame their communications about it with producers. Researchers K. R. Wilson and S. C. Mukembo surveyed 112 Missouri extension professionals online.

They concluded:
• Extension professionals need participatory training on climate change
• They also need to build climate literacy while teaching climate scientists best practices for communicating these issues to the public

According to the report, lack of an official standard for food-date labeling in the U.S. leaves consumers unsure about what the labels mean. Congressional Research Service has indicated that date-labeling confusion causes 7% of all U.S. food waste.

You can read “I talk to producers like I’m a producer” by open access.


Communicator events approaching

Here are event plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

April 3-7, 2024.  Annual conference, Society of Environmental Journalists, Philadelphia, PA.  Information: https://sej.org/initiatives/sej2024-annual-conference-philadelphia-pennsylvania-april-3-7

April 22-25, 2024
Conference of the Association for International Agricultural and Extension Education (AIAEE) at the University of Florida, Gainesville.
Information: https://www.aiaee.org/2024-Conference

April 24-26, 2024
“Bright Horizons.” Conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://www.nama.org/2024_amc.html

April 29-May 1, 2024
Annual meeting of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association (TOCA) in Las Vegas, Nevada. Information: https://www.toca.org/toca-events

May 16-18, 2024. “Return to horse country,” conference of American Horse Publications (AHP) in Lexington, Kentucky. Information: https://www.americanhorsepubs.org/ahp-annual-conference/


A closing thought

We close this February issue of ACDC News with a Norwegian proverb about the pace of learning to interact with others:

“A child learns to speak quicker than he learns to keep silent”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

January News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 24-01

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Climate messaging off target

Some of the messages most favored by climate activists to draw public support for climate policies are “hitting the wrong notes.” That conclusion in a recent Reuters article reflected the results of a global survey among 60,000 respondents in 23 countries.

• Most were not persuaded to support climate policies because of messaging focused on “phasing out” fossil fuels.
• Also, most respondents were not persuaded by messaging about creating “green jobs” or “keeping fossil fuels in the ground.”
• Instead, “by far the most effective way to change a person’s mind to support climate policies is to focus on the urgent need to protect the next generation.”

You can read the article here.


Reviewing the state of rural and community journalism

We are adding to the ACDC collection recent insights from Al Cross, Director of the Institute for Rural Journalism and Community Issues at the University of Kentucky. He responded to five questions in an interview with the Woodford (Kentucky) Sun News:

• What’s the state of community journalism these days?
• What can a good community newspaper bring to the community?
• How do you respond when someone says, “Nobody reads newspapers anymore?”
• So what do you see in the future for community newspapers?
• It seems that journalists are under attack in an unprecedented way. When someone challenges your integrity or seems to believe that because you’re a journalist you lean in one direction, what do you tell them?

You can read the responses here.


Farmer views: how farm data should be collected and used

Solutions from the Land, a nonprofit organization, recently released a report written by a team of farmers about how data should be collected, analyzed and used in support of sustainable development. These farmers represented different production systems across the United States.

“The report affirms farmers are the owners of the data they generate on the farm and details fourteen recommendations for those who make data management decisions.”

You can read the report, “Data policy guidance on farm data,” here.


Media coverage of mercury contamination in the Canadian Arctic

Signs of communications problems in public health and safety emerged from results of an analysis we are adding from Polar Research (2019). A team of researchers at Trent University and Washington State University analyzed the content of 14 newspapers in the Canadian North and South. Findings indicated:

• Few indigenous people were cited as information sources
• Articles often failed to describe mercury to the reader
• Many articles did not provide direction to support self-efficacy

You can read the article by open access here.


“Food-date labels are adding to the problem of food waste”

Food-data labels such as “use by” and “best if used by” confuse consumers and prompt them to discard food that is safe. So indicated the November 2023 Consumer Food Insights Report from Purdue University Center for Food Demand Analysis and Sustainability. The indication was based on results of a survey among 1,200 U.S. consumers.

Findings indicated that most consumers mistakenly interpret “best if used by” and “use-by” as an indicator of food safety. Instead, the U.S. Department of Agriculture Food Safety and Inspection Service defines those descriptions as references to peak food quality rather than the date after which the food is no longer safe to eat.

According to the report, lack of an official standard for food-date labeling in the U.S. leaves consumers unsure about what the labels mean. Congressional Research Service has indicated that date-labeling confusion causes 7% of all U.S. food waste.

You can read this Packer article here.


Communicator events approaching

Here are event plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

April 22-25, 2024
Conference of the Association for International Agricultural and Extension Education (AIAEE) at the University of Florida, Gainesville.
Information: https://www.aiaee.org/2024-Conference

April 24-26, 2024
“Bright Horizons.” Conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://www.nama.org/2024_amc.html

April 29-May 1, 2024
Annual meeting of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association (TOCA) in Las Vegas, Nevada. Information: https://www.toca.org/toca-events


A closing thought

We end this January issue of ACDC News with a Dutch proverb touching on the dynamics of what we say:

“Out of the abundance of the heart the mouth speaks”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

December News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 23-12

Click here for a printer-friendly PDF of this issue


Warm holiday greetings

Dear friends of the ACDC,

As this Illinois prairieland settles in for the winter season, we want to wish you a safe and cheerful holiday season! Thank you for your interest in efforts here at the University of Illinois to identify and share useful research, news, and perspectives for strengthening communications related to agriculture, broadly defined and globally.

The ACDC team appreciates your continued support and is looking forward to helping you with your research needs in the coming year.


An insight about speaking

We close this December issue of ACDC News with a Austrian proverb:

“In gratitude lies great force.”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

November News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 23-11

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Visiting agricultural journalist from Ireland

How pleased we were in ACDC to help host an agricultural journalist and media researcher from Ireland last month. Claire Mc Cormack joined us during October 16-27. She was the first visiting agricultural journalist in a new, global agricultural communications initiative at the University of Illinois. A news release about her visit explained:

“Mc Cormack is a researcher in media work and agriculture at the School of Agriculture and Food Science at University College Dublin. She is currently completing her Ph.D., having received a 2021 Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship Award from the Irish Research Council.”

You can learn more about her career interests and activities here.


“SEIZED … but not silenced”

A feisty community newspaper in east-central Kansas used that headline in response to being raided on August 11 by local police. Officers carried computers, phones and other reporting materials from the offices of the Marion County Record in the town of about 2,000 residents. They also raided the homes of the editor-publisher and one of the city council members. This raid – and subsequent return of seized property – got international attention. It touched on the sensitive issue of press freedom and protection under the First Amendment.

You can read a variety of news reports about the raid by entering “Marion County Record” in your favorite search engine.


Gaps in Arctic media reporting about mercury

We are adding to the ACDC collection a 2019 article in Polar Research about media coverage of mercury contamination in the Canadian Arctic. Authors analyzed 14 newspapers in the Canadian North and South.

Results indicated:

  • Few indigenous residents were cited as information sources
  • Articles often failed to describe mercury to the reader
  • Many did not provide direction to support self-efficacy

You can read the article by open access here.


How national cultures align with climate change policies

Results of a new international study suggest that “individualistic countries are characterized by greater climate change policy performance.” Also, researcher Trung V. Vu reported in the Journal of Economics and Development that such cultures involve relatively greater female political representation.

You can read the article here.


Views and use of vitamin D supplementation among community-dwelling adults in the UK

A 2023 article in PLOS ONE revealed need and desire of more information about use of vitamin D among community-dwelling adults in the United Kingdom. Results showed:
• Three-fourths of the respondents were aware of vitamin D
• About one-half were taking supplements
• They were willing to pay for supplements, supporting a self-care agenda
• Intake of vitamin D supplements declined significantly with advancing age
• They accepted food fortification, but were uncertain about how to balance food intake with supplementation

You can read the article by open access here.


Communicator events approaching

Here are event plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

November 17, 2023
Agricultural Writers SA Awards, Capetown, South Africa.
Information: https://www.agriculturalwriterssa.co.za/event/agricultural-writers-sa-awards-evening/

January 24-25, 2024
Professional Development Workshop of the Cooperative Communicators Association (CCA) in Montgomery, Alabama.
Information: https://communicators.coop/professional-development/workshops

April 22-25, 2024
Conference of the Association for International Agricultural and Extension Education (AIAEE) at the University of Florida, Gainesville.
Information: https://www.aiaee.org/2024-Conference

April 24-26, 2024
“Bright Horizons.” Conference of the National Agri-Marketing Association (NAMA) in Kansas City, Missouri. Information: https://www.nama.org/2024_amc.html

April 29-May 1, 2024
Annual meeting of the Turf and Ornamental Communicators Association (TOCA) in Las Vegas, Nevada. Information: https://www.toca.org/toca-events


An insight about speaking

We close this November issue of ACDC News with a German proverb:

“Speaking comes by nature, silence by understanding”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu

October News and Research from the ACDC– Issue 23-10

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Update on ag-gag laws

An October 2022 posting from Sentient Media provided an update we are adding to the ACDC collection. Author Hemi Kim briefly described “state and federal laws that make it a crime for people to take photos or videos inside animal agriculture operations.” The description included:

  • features and origins of the laws
  • free speech issues and risks they involve
  • S. states that currently have them in place

You can read the commentary here.


Unique ethical issues for rural and remote communities in the COVID-19 pandemic

“Rural healthcare must overcome misinformation and fear among residents,” a team of Canadian and U.S. medical specialists emphasized in a 2020 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics.

“Reliance on larger clinical and academic institutions can be both valuable and ethically challenging. While policies and processes during a pandemic can be shared across institutions, often the smaller rural clinical sites and agencies that are treating the most vulnerable of populations are note well-informed, typically do not have a collaborative presence during deliberations about best practices and shared policies, and the socio-cultural aspects of rural populations are often ignored.”

You can read this article by open access here.


Edible insects – Some sampling in Portugal

A recent study published in Food investigated the knowledge, attitudes, consumption habits, and degree of acceptability of edible insects among a sample of 213 Portuguese consumers. Investigators found:

  • Surveyed consumers tended to have correct perceptions about the sustainability issues associated with insects as alternative sources of protein
  • Level of knowledge and overall perception of the nutritive value of insects was low
  • Few of the surveyed consumers had already eaten them
  • Most consumers were reluctant to consume whole insects
  • Potentials exist for starting with foods that incorporate edible insects

You can read this article here.


Drought information falling short on the ranch

We are adding to the ACDC collection a 2018 Climate Risk Management article in which researchers highlighted existence and penalties of inadequate, unreliable climate information for ranch management.

Authors reviewed related literature to draw out the drought management options as well as the tools and products for drought monitoring and early warning. They found a large gap between the information needs of ranchers and the information that is available.

You can read the article here.


Addressing ethical relations in a rural Japanese hospital

Researchers Ryuichi Ohta and Chiaki Sano used a planned approach to help a rural hospital address an ethical dilemma often encountered in medicine. It involved the relationship between resident physicians and pharmaceutical company representatives. As reported in Cureus, the researchers used evidence-based learning to overcome challenges presented by conflicts of interest.

You can read the article here.


Communicator events approaching

Here are event plans you may find helpful, with contact information you can use for details. We welcome suggestions or revisions for this calendar.

November 1-2, 2023
“Level up: Reaching all communities” Association for Communication Excellence (ACE) virtual conference. Information: https://aceweb.org/event-5367868

November 14-16, 2023
“Looking to the future” Australasia Pacific Extension Network (APEN) international conference in Launceston, Tasmania, Australia.
Information: https://www.apen.org.au/events/conference

November 15-17, 2023
“Homecoming.”  80th Annual Convention of the National Association of Farm Broadcasting (NAFB) in Kansas City, Missouri.
Information: https://nafb.com/events/nafb-convention

November 17, 2023
Agricultural Writers SA Awards, Capetown, South Africa
Information: https://www.agriculturalwriterssa.co.za/event/agricultural-writers-sa-awards-evening/


How we learn

We close this issue of ACDC News with a Norwegian proverb about how we learn:

“What mother and father don’t teach, the world teaches”

Best regards and wishes

ACDC is a deep and open resource for you, so please feel free to invite our help as you search for information, local to global. You are welcome to follow us on Twitter @ACDCUIUC. And please suggest (or send) agricultural communications documents we might add to this unique and valued international collection. We welcome them in hard copy (sent to Ag Comm Documentation Center, 510 ACES Library, 1101 S. Goodwin Avenue, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801) – or in electronic format sent to acdc@library.illinois.edu