Non Solus Blog

Elijah P. Lovejoy, “Liberty’s Martyr”

Elijah Lovejoy was a reverend and printer in Alton, Illinois, in the 1830s. He was the editor for the Alton Observer, a religious newspaper with a pro-abolition stance. His journey to Alton was not a smooth one. He had three printing presses destroyed before he settled in Alton—all three times the vandalism was in response Read More

The Menace Behind the Magick: A Halloween Pop-Up Exhibit at the RBML

25 October – 07 November 2018 Curated by Taylor Fisk Henning & Kellie Clinton Twenty years ago, J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone was first published in the United States. The book, followed by six more volumes in the Harry Potter series, soon became a cultural phenomenon which led to eight films, numerous Read More

First Appearances: Jane Eyre, Moby-Dick, and Winnie-the-Pooh

by Katie Funderberg, Xena Becker, and Kellie Clinton Jane Eyre Significantly impacting the genre of prose fiction, Jane Eyre, originally subtitled An Autobiography, was first appeared on October 16th, 1847 under the pen name Currer Bell. Speculation over the author’s identity and the novelty of a book commenting on issues such as religion, class, and Read More

This Just In: Happy Birthday H.G. Wells!

Herbert George Wells was born on this day in 1866 and we want to take the occasion to celebrate his life and work. The Rare Book and Manuscript Library is proud to serve as the steward for the author’s papers and correspondence, as well as a large collection of manuscripts and print editions of Wells’ Read More

Ballad of Birmingham: 55 Years Later

55 years ago, on September 15th, 1963 , white supremacists bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four young girls and injuring 23 other children. It was Youth Day at the church and the children were gathered in the basement when the bomb went off. The church was a hub of activity Read More

Building a Library: The Cavagna Sangiuliani Collection at Illinois

Building a Library: The Cavagna Sangiuliani Collection at Illinois On display September 14 – December 14, 2018 Curated by Chloe Ottenhoff In 1921, the University of Illinois purchased the Cavagna Sangiuliani Collection of Italian imprints and manuscripts from the descendants of Count Antonio Cavagna Sangiuliani di Gualdana (1843-1913) as part of a wider effort to Read More

The Edge of Civilization: Survival Stories in Early Children’s Literature

The Edge of Civilization: Survival Stories in Early Children’s Literature A pop-up exhibit at the Rare Book & Manuscript Library 25 April – 09 May 2018 Curated by Kathryn Funderburg Dystopian novels like The Hunger Games and Divergent might seem like a modern trend, but survival narratives have been a standard subgenre of children’s literature Read More

On This Day: Charlotte Brontë Dies, 1855

On this Day: Charlotte Brontë dies, 1855 Perhaps no family has left the same kind of mark on English literature as the Brontë sisters. Charlotte (1816-1855), Emily (1818-1848), and Anne (1820-1849) were all accomplished poets and authors, best known for Charlotte’s Jane Eyre (1847), Emily’s  Wuthering Heights (1847), and Anne’s The Tenant of Wildfell Hall (1848).  The Read More

Almanacchi Italiani

Almanacchi Italiani A  pop-up exhibit at the Rare Book & Manuscript Library Spring 2018 Curated by Gabriella Stuardi & Chloe Ottenhoff Just in time for the spring planting season, this exhibition presents some of the most curious and unique Italian almanacs held in the Cavagna Sangiuliani Collection, acquired by the University of Illinois in 1921. Read More

Color Onstage

The colors that costumers and set designers use can really influence the way that an audience perceives something they see on stage. Color can make a certain character the center of attention, suggest a particular mood for the scene, or signify change of some kind or another. The swatches above show the color schemes Motley Read More