The Illinois Newspaper Project (INP) identifies, preserves, and digitizes Illinois newspapers. We also help researchers locate the Illinois newspapers they need. The INP is an initiative of the History, Philosophy, and Newspaper Library, and the Department of Preservation Services, at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Linotype operator on the Chicago Defender, Negro newspaper. Chicago, Illinois
Linotype operator on the Chicago Defender, Negro newspaper. Chicago, Illinois. Photographed by Russell Lee for the Farm Security Administration. Courtesy of Farm Security Administration – Office of War Information Photograph Collection (Library of Congress) LC-USF34-038648-D (b&w film neg.)

 

The Universalist

The Universalist was a religious newspaper published near the end of the nineteenth century, a century when religious newspapers proliferated alongside the denominations they documented. Denominationalism was a distinctive feature…[read more]

The National Prohibitionist

From 1907 to 1911 the National Prohibitionist was the official organ of the Prohibition Party, an influential “third party” of the Progressive Era. The Progressive Era produced at least twenty “third” parties, and the Prohibition Party was among the more influential, certainly the most enduring…[read more]

Newly Digitized Immigrant Newspaper: Irish Republic

The Fenian Brotherhood, a secret society of Irish nationalists, founded the Chicago Irish Republic in 1867. At the time, Chicago had the fourth largest Irish population in the United States and was considered a “hotbed” of militant Fenianism: for example, in 1864 the Chicago Fenians tried to declare war on England; in 1865 and 1866 they attempted armed invasions of Canada…[read more]

The Daily Worker: A Communist Newspaper out of Chicago

The Daily Worker was created for Communist Party USA members in 1921. The paper was originally titled the Worker, centered in Chicago and marketed as a weekly newspaper for the first three years of its existence. It then moved to New York City and carried out a pre-planned expansion into a daily broadsheet with a new name, Daily Worker. Publication under this new title lasted from 1924 to 1958. Daily Worker was primarily focused on issues relating to organized labor…[read more]

A Twentieth Century Church-State (in Illinois)

Zion City was a utopian religious community founded in July 1901 by John Alexander Dowie, an evangelical minister and pioneer of Pentecostalism in the United States. Dowie emigrated from Australia in 1888, and eventually settled in Chicago where, in 1893, he established a ministry near the World’s Columbian Exposition. Central to Dowie’s ministry was the practice of faith healing, and it proved enormously popular. He soon formed a publishing company to issue his sizable output of periodicals, books, and pamphlets…[read more]

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