Zdenka and Stanley B. Winters Czech and Slovak Poster Collection, 1920-1991

Collection Resources

Books and articles

Institutions featured in the posters

Other Collections of Czech Posters

Images of Czech posters


Books & Articles
  1. Studio najbrt & lev: Graphic design, czechoslovakia.(1998). Graphis; Graphis, (317) 152-157. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Examines the work of the Studio Najbrt & Lev, a graphic design studio based in Prague and founded by Ales Najbrt and Pavel Lev in 1994, which won a number of design awards including the Grand Prix at the 17th International Biennale of Graphic Design in Brno, 1996. Presents work by Lev and Najbrt, including exhibition and film posters and magazine covers for Raut magazine.
  2. Ahoi! brno.(1990). Form, (131) 40-41. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    A report on the XIV Biennale of Graphic Design (including posters, advertising and corporate identity) held in Brno in 1990.
  3. The best czechoslovak posters competition ‘87/’88.(1990). Design Journal (Korea), (23) 39-43. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    A report on the Best Czechoslovak Posters Competition 1987/88, with examples of the award winning work.
  4. The XIV biennale brno ad, poster and CI show.(1990). Design Journal (Korea), (31) 60-65. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    Report on the XIV Biennale of Graphic Design (advertising, posters and corporate identity), held in Brno, Czechoslovakia June-September 1990.
  5. XII brno biennale: Ads and poster review.(1990). Design Journal (Korea), (27) 60-65. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    Report on the 1986 Brno Biennale of advertising and poster, with examples of posters exhibited.
  6. Aulich, James and Marta Sylvestrová. Political posters in Central and Eastern Europe, 1945-95: signs of the times. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1999.
  7. Baleka, J. Angazovaný plakat. Praha: Svaz s. výtvarných umelcu, výstavní ústredí a nakladatelství Svoboda, 1969.
  8. Bartelt, D. (1990). Contemporary Czechoslovak posters : a traveling exhibition of Czechoslovak posters dating from the 1960's through the 1980's. Raleigh, NC: City Gallery of Contemporary Art, 1990.
    Catalog of exhibition curated by Dana Bartelt, with an essay by Anna Dvorák.
  9. Bartelt, D. (1991). Czech design in the new era. Print, 45(1) 37-49. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    A report on trends in contemporary Czech graphic design. "Despite the repressive nature in communist rule in Czechoslovakia" writes the author, "graphic artists turned out expressive, highly idiosyncratic work - particularly posters. Will these qualities be undermined by the new market economy?" she questions.
  10. Becker, H., & Leu, O. (1995). Zdenek ziegler. Novum Gebrauchsgraphik; Novum Gebrauchsgraphik, 66(5) 18-25. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Considers the career of the Czech graphic designer Zdenek Ziegler, who first became involved with film and theatre poster design in 1962, and who now also works in the fields of typography, advertising and exhibition design. The author discusses the style of Ziegler's poster designs, noting the combination of craftsmanship, typography and computer technology. He cites the views of the writer Olaf Leu on Ziegler's work, with reference to the `international' nature of his posters, which also appeal to Western audiences, and his ability to `surmount political barriers'. He concludes by observing the general decline in the standard of Czech poster design since the fall of the Iron Curtain.
  11. Chatelain, R. (1991). Repères pour l'art nouveau. TM SGM RSI; TM SGM RSI, (4) 49-53. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Notes the influence of Art Nouveau on graphic design at the beginning of the 20th century and the increasing popularity of the graphic arts in the years 1880-1900. The author profiles two artists active at this time, Swiss-born Eugène Grasset (1845-1917) and the Czech Alphonse Mucha (1860-1939), who both lived and worked in France. One of Grasset's most famous works was the illustration of the Histoire des Quatre Fils Aymon (1883), which has been described as `the illustrators' bible'. He was also known for his posters, typographic and stamp designs. Mucha was also a well-known poster artist and book illustrator and created many posters for the theatre. The distinctive motif in his work was the idealized female figure. In 1904 he moved to New York where he designed stage sets. Some have suggested that Mucha was Grasset's pupil and the author concludes that further research is needed into the relationship between the two artists.
  12. Crowley, D. (1990). Urgent images from the street. Blueprint, (68) 60. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    Report on the exhibition 'Recent Political Posters from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union', held at the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, until 1 July 1990.
  13. Dowdy, C. (2003). Poster child. Print; Print, 57(4) 66-73. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Discusses the work of Czech graphic designer Ales Najbrt and his graphic design company Studio Najbrt, established nine years ago in Prague, and now managed with business and design partner Pavel Lev. The author traces the influences of theatre and communism on Studio Najbrt's designs, describes their production of posters for theatrical companies, the design, and editing of the cultural magazine Raut, and their production of film posters for the Karlovy Vary International Film Festival. She argues that Najbrt's work is characterized by experimentation and irony, suggests that these are traits typical of designers who came to the fore under communism, and describes the post-communist market economy in the Czech Republic, the requirement for companies to develop a corporate identity and Studio Najbrt's corporate identity designs, noting their successful reconciliation of avant-garde design with satisfying client briefs. She concludes by suggesting that Studio Najbrt needs to continue undertaking corporate design work to support their cultural projects.
  14. Fendley, T., & Richmond, R. (1993). Propaganda for the pocket. Eye; Eye, 3(10) 48-53. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Discusses the use by state authorities in the former Eastern Bloc of matchboxes to promote official communist ideology. The authors examines the use of matchboxes as propaganda material in the Czech Republic from the 1950s to the 1980s with reference to the output of three companies: Solo Lipnik, Solo Susice and Smrecina B. Bystrica. They describe how the subject matter of the designs was dictated by the sponsors of the advertisement and often comprised references to social and technological advances. The state actively encouraged collection of matchboxes bearing propaganda, and the authors note that the Czechoslovakian Union of Matchbox Collectors had more than 5000 members in the 1980s.
  15. Finková, D., & Petrová, S. The militant poster, 1936-1985. Prague : International Organization of Journalists, 1986. Retrieved June 23, 2005, from OCLC Worldcat.
  16. Flejsar, J., & Pasienka, A, & Sylvestrová, M. Josef Flejsar, zaslouzilý umelec : Plakáty : Katalog výstavy, Brno 30. 11. 1989 - 9. 1. 1990. Brno: Moravská galerie, 1989. Retrieved February 16, 2005, from OCLC Worldcat.
  17. Heller, S. (1994). (Sutnar). Eye; Eye, 4(13) 44-57. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Profiles the Czechoslovak-born designer Ladislav Sutnar (1897-1976), who moved to the U.S.A. in 1939. Sutnar used the tenets of the European avant-garde and modernism to produce effective commercial typographies. The author chronicles Sutnar's career, describing in detail some of the typographic solutions that established him as an successful communicator in commercial work. He also assesses the extent of the influence of Sutnar's work on graphic designers in the U.S.A. into the 1960s.
  18. Holy, B. (1995). Artistic typography - jan solpera. Idea; Idea, 43(249) 88-93. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Profiles the Czech graphic designer Jan Solpera. The author states that the designer is fascinated by typography and its place in art, and discusses the distinctive elements of lettering and colour in his poster designs. He describes Solpera's work in the field of book cover design, and notes that he also designs signs and stamps. The author outlines the designer's career as a teacher at the academy of arts, architecture and design in Prague, and as a writer for the trade journal Typografia.
  19. Horsham, M. (1996). Out of the time warp. Blueprint; Blueprint, (131) 36-43. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Reports on developments in Czech design in Prague following the revolution of 1989. The author notes that there is a market for both European and Czech design in Prague, considers the efforts of the architect Mojimir Ranny to promote Czech design, and attempts to explain why designers in Prague are less motivated than they are in other European cities, where they are granted more artistic freedom. He comments on the work of architects who are renovating the centre of Prague, asserts that graphic design is an area of expansion in the Czech Republic, and refers to the work of graphic designers including Pavel Lev, Tomas Machek, and Karla Krisova. He cites the views of Czech designers who compare the attitudes of their colleagues to those of European designers, and concludes by noting that the country and its design industry are still in the process of being restructured.
  20. Horsham, M. (1996). Prague graphics. Blueprint, (131) 43. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    Looks at the work emerging from graphic designers in Prague, including Ales Najbrt, Tomas Machek and Karla Kvisova.
  21. Horsham, M. (1995). Soirée in the ruins. Eye; Eye, 5(17) 38-43. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Discusses the work of the Czech graphic designer Alés Najbrt with reference to graphic design in the Czech Republic. The author comments on the extent to which Czech graphic design reflects the growth of commercialism in the country and states that the task facing designers, including Najbrt, is to provide an identity for new corporations. He discusses the influence of the computer boom on the works of Czech designers who would formerly draw lettering by hand, traces the history of Czech design and comments on Najbrt's use of pre-War typography and imagery.
  22. Horsham, M. (1993). Closely observed czechs. Blueprint; Blueprint, (100) 68-69. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Examines the state of graphic design in the Czech Republic following the fall of communism. The author notes the `inevitable' influence of Western design elements on Czech work, not least of all because of the sponsorship provided by Western companies. He observes the poor educational base for design in the Czech Republic and considers that this is a contributory factor to the poverty of Czech design as a whole.
  23. Janakova, I. (1998). The search for continuity - young czech designers. Baseline, (25) 9-16. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    A review of work by the current generation of Czech designers, including Ales Najbrt, Tomas Machek, Petr Babak, Klara Kvizova, Robert Vojtech Novak and Frantisek Storm.
  24. Janakova, I. (1998). The search for continuity: Young czech designers. Baseline; Baseline, (25) 9-16. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Discusses the current state of the graphic design industry in the Czech Republic, with particular reference to the work of young graphic designers including Ale Najbrt, Karel Teige, Toma Machek, Klara Kvizova and Robert Vojtech Novak. The author traces the history of graphic design in the country over the last few decades, notes the influence of the country's post-revolutionary upheaval on the discipline, and examines the influence of the British graphic designer Neville Brody on the current generation of designers. She describes the magazine Raut, which features the work of young designers and has won several international graphic design awards, and examines work by the above designers for books and posters.
  25. Kindt, M. M. L. (1996). Jirí salamoun: Archaic, anarchic, expressive. Novum; Novum, (4) 60-65. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Profiles the Czech artist, graphic designer and illustrator Jirí Salamoun (b.1935), who specializes in book illustration, cinema poster design, typography, chromolithography and silk-screen printing. The author discusses aspects of his career and work, noting parallels to children's art, his use of free calligraphy in his work, and its surreal and erotic elements. Details of his techniques and clients are appended.
  26. Kroutvor, J. (1991). Poselství ulice: z dejin plakátu a promen doby. Praha: COMET, 1991.
  27. Lorent, C. (1998). Art moderne et contemporain: Petite tentative de panorama. Art et Culture; Art et Culture, 13(2) 26-27. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    In 1998 the Europalia festival in Brussels featured the art and culture of the Czech Republic. The author considers exponents of Czech art omitted from the event, including the work of the sculptor and architect Stanislav Kolibal (b.1925), the painters Josef Sima (1891-1971) and Vaclav Bostik (b.1913), and the photographer Jan Saudek. He examines the impact of the period of repression after 1968 on Czech culture, describes the emergence of innovative figures in the graphic arts during the 1960s and 1970s, and emphasizes the country's continuing tradition of creative vitality despite its political vicissitudes.
  28. Matsura, N. (1993). Modern czech posters. Idea; Idea, 41(241) 60-65. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Considers the development of Czech poster design, tracing its history from the founding of the Mánes group and the work of Alphonse Mucha in France. The author also briefly outlines the contribution to Czech poster design and typography of Jaroslav Sura, Karel Misek, Jan Rajlich, Ales Lamr, Jan Solpera and Petr Pos, whose work illustrates the article. Short biographies of each artist are also supplied.
  29. Middendorp, J. (1999). Ale najbrt: Praagse protagonist. Items; Items, 18(3) 22-27. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Describes the career of Ale Najbrt, one of the few Czech graphic designers to insist on the importance of artistic rather than commercial values in advertising and publicity. Since 1989, with the end of communism and the opening-up of the Czech Republic to Western market forces, the situation became so frustrating that in 1994 Najbrt set up his own design studio with Pavel Lev. The author surveys Najbrt's creative enterprises including the magazine Raut, a showcase for visual art by both famous and unknown artists, and his designs for SPT-Telecom, subsequently withdrawn as a result of internal disputes which, like the shortage of money for imaginative projects and salaries half those of their Western counterparts, are constant problems for Czech artists and designers.
  30. Perlez, J. (1998). The ultimate triumph of zdenek ziegler. Graphis, 54(315) 86-95. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    A profile of Zdenek Ziegler, described as the "master of Czech graphic design". Born in 1932, Ziegler studied architecture at the Technical University in Prague. On graduating in 1961 he took up design rather than architecture. From the 1960s through to the 1980s he was known principally for his film posters. He had an ability to make "fabulous posters" for often quite mediocre films, says the author. However, the end of he Communist regime in Czechoslovakia also spelled the end of the Czech film poster as an art form. Ziegler switched to teaching and book design. He recently won a contest to design the jackets of 13 hardcover books of Franz Kafka's works.
  31. Perlez, J. (1998). The ultimate triumph of zdenek ziegler. Graphis; Graphis, (315) 86-95. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Examines the career of the Czech graphic designer Zdenek Ziegler (b.1932), with particular reference to the film posters he created from the early 1960s onwards. The author describes the style of Ziegler's posters, notes the prizes he won in various international poster competitions during the 1960s, and comments on his use of typography. She discusses the effects on Ziegler's career of the communist regime in Czechoslovakia, notes his reaction to the Western graphic design he came across in magazines and during his trip to the U.S.A. in 1985, studies the significance of the 1989 revolution on the design industry in the Czech Republic, and concludes by assessing his attitude to the teaching of design.
  32. Podzimek, T. (1993). Jan rajlich, jr. Idea; Idea, 41(238) 56-61. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Presents the art of Czech graphic designer Jan Rajlich, Jr. The author describes Rajlich's art which ranges from posters and newspaper illustration to logo and trademark design. He also discusses Rajlich's techniques and his use of geometric symbols. A biography detailing Rajlich's memberships, exhibitions and a list of publications in which his work has featured is included.
  33. Prahl, R. (1992). Plakát první výstavy SVU mánes: Provokace mezi revoltou a utopií. Umení; Umení, 40(1) 23-36. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Mánes, an association of artists that became the forum of modernism in Bohemia, was established in 1887 and held the first members' exhibition in 1898. The author focuses on the background and early development of this Secessionist group, whose later style is more widely known. The sketch for the winning design for the poster for the first exhibition, by Arnost Hofbauer, is viewed as an attempt at self-definition by the group, and it is concluded that the ambiguity of language to be found in posters was both used and misused in this instance. Other early Mánes documents are studied to illustrate the rapidly changing beliefs of the modernists.
  34. Sarver, L. (1995). Scenofest sidebar: Frantisek zelenka, scenographer (1904-1994). TD & T Theatre Design & Technology, 31(2) 41-42. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    A profile of Czech architect and theatre designer Frantisek Zelenka, the subject of an exhibition at the Lethaby Gallery at London's Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, 5-23 September 1994. Born in Bohemia in 1904, Zelenka was influenced by the "whimsy, irreverence, and playfulness of Dada, Surrealism, and the innovations of the Bauhaus". He started his theatrical career in 1926 designing posters and sets for the National Theatre in Prague. He soon established a reputation for his designs and soon he began to work for theatres not only in Prague but Brno, Olomouc and Kutna Hora, From 1926-1941, he collaborated with many of the great names in the Czech theatre. In 1943, Zelenka, was transported , along with his wife and child, to the concentration camp at Terezin. There, he established himself as the "theatrical impresario", designing sets for several productions in the camp. His career as a designer was cut short when on, 19 October 1944, the Zelenka were transported again, this time to Auschwitz, where he was murdered.
  35. Schaller, S. (1998). Miro pistek: Design and advertising from wagner's bayreuth. Novum; Novum, (4) 60-65. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Discusses the work of the Czech-born graphic designer Miro Pistek, who works in Bayreuth, Germany. The author describes Pistek's approach to graphic design and his intention to avoid what he considers commonplace design, notes his training in Prague, and identifies the main source of his inspiration. She considers the corporate identities he has created for companies of varying size in Germany, assesses his use of colour, and examines his use of computer and airbrush technology.
  36. Scubert, Z. (1994). Henryk tomaszewski plakaty. Plakat Journal, (3) 25. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    (Prague: Umleleckoprumsyslove Museum, 1994. Text in Czech and English). Catalogue of an exhibition at the Umleleckoprumsyslove Museum, Prague, of posters by Henryk Tomaszewski.
  37. Smithsonian Institution (1992). Art as activist: revolutionary posters from Central and Eastern Europe. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, 1992.
  38. St'áva, A. (1993). Michal cihlár. Výtvarné Umení; Výtvarné Umení, (2-3) 34-36. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Brief biography of Prague-based graphic artist Michal Cihlár, who specializes in Pop art influenced colour linocuts. The author summarizes Cihlár's numerous exhibitions and prizes in the Czech Republic and abroad, for example at the Warhol museum in Medzilaborce in 1989 and 1991, various stage, book and record cover designs, a 1989 Christmas poster for Civic Forum and wallpaper, with beer as a theme, for the Czech pavilion at EXPO 92 in Seville.
  39. Steinbrenner, K. H. (1997). Against all odds. How; How, 12(4) 52-56. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Discusses the career of the Czech graphic designer Jan Rajlich. The author describes Rajlich's education at a private art school during the Nazi occupation of Czechoslovakia, the difficulties facing graphic designers under the communist regime, and the work that Rajlich produced despite these difficulties. He assesses the impact that the collapse of communism in 1989 and the resulting increase in the free exchange of ideas had on the design community in the Czech Republic, and comments on Rajlich's founding of the Brno International Biennale of Graphic Design in 1963. The author mentions the design prizes that Rajlich has won and outlines his current work and his plans for the future.
  40. Taborda, F. (1993). Praxis. Novum Gebrauchsgraphik; Novum Gebrauchsgraphik, 64(2) 26-31. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    An account of the work of one of Canada's best known graphic design studios - Praxis. Its senior partners are Czech-born Henry Vilimek, the Argentinian Roberto Dosil and Canadian David Young. The author describes how `the balanced blend of different cultures' has enabled the firm to produce work of a consistently high quality.
  41. Taborda, F., & Foulkes, D. (1993). People. HotGraphics International; HotGraphics International, (14) 20. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the ARTbibliographies Modern database.
    Profiles British graphic designer Andy Vella, Czech design group Typo &, and British design company Fuel. Vella, who specializes in the design of record and CD covers, briefly outlines his techniques and expresses his desire to become more involved with corporate design. The authors examine the work of Typo &, composed of 12 Czech designers, including Zdenek Ziegler and Jan Solpera, in the context of Czech graphic design history in the 20th century. Fuel, established by Peter Miles, Damon Murray, Stephen Sorrell and Nick Oates, have worked on projects for Virgin Records and the Diesel clothing company.
  42. Timmers, M. (1990). Posters of freedom. Eye, 1(1) 32-39. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    A review of contemporary East European political posters in the collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum, London. Reproduces posters from Hungary, East Germany, Poland, Romania and Czechoslovakia
  43. Torri, G. (1990). Europa che cambia: Un mostra e un seminario sul ‘Manifesto dell’Est’. Domus, (716) 12-13. Retrieved November 22, 2004, from the DAAI: Design and Applied Arts Index database.
    Report on an exhibition of recent posters from Czechoslovakia, Poland and Hungary held in Turin(?) during March-April 1990. Concurrent with the exhibition, a seminar was organised by the European Design Institute of Turin, and held on 2 April 1990.
Institutions Featured in the Posters
Other Collections of Czech Posters (at museums and privately held)
Images of Czech Posters Online



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