Digital Content Creation

 


 

Digital Content Creation

415 Library, MC-522
1408 W. Gregory
Urbana, IL 61801

(217) 244-2062

Email: digicc [at] library.illinois.edu

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Large Scale Book Digitization Projects at Illinois

 

Large Scale Book Digitization Projects at Illinois

 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library is currently participating in three large scale book digitization projects through which it is creating digitized copies of books in its collections that are now in the public domain.  Through large scale book digitization projects, the Library also digitizes books and journals copyrighted by the University of Illinois Board of Trustees or those for which the Library has received permission to digitize from the copyright holder.

 

Open Content Alliance


Since 2007, the Library has been a member of the Open Content Alliance, a collaborative effort of a group of cultural, technology, nonprofit, and governmental organizations from around the world that helps build a permanent archive of multilingual digitized text and multimedia material. The OCA encourages access to and reuse of collections in the archive, while respecting the content owners and contributors.  The Library is contributing digital content to the Internet Archive in several areas: Illinois history, culture and natural resources; U.S. railroad history; rural studies and agriculture; works in translation; as well as extensive collections of 19th century "triple-decker" novels and emblem books written between 1540 and 1800. The Library is also a contributing member of the Biodiversity Heritage Library and, in collaboration with the Chicago Field Museum, is scanning and contributing to the Internet Archive all publications in the Museum's Fieldiana series. The Library's contributed material is available through Illinois Harvest, the Internet Archive website and through Yahoo! and other search engines and sites.  This content will also be available soon through the Hathi Trust.

 

Google Books Project

 

In 2007, the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC), of which the University of Illinois is a member, partnered with Google to digitize as many as 10 million volumes across all CIC library systems. This project represents one of the largest cooperative ventures of its kind in higher education, one that will enable CIC institutions to preserve a vast realm of legacy content and make material available worldwide within just a few years.

 Under the terms of this landmark agreement, Google will scan some of the most distinctive collections from CIC libraries and their 79 million volumes. These legacy collections are known to scholars worldwide, reflecting decades of careful investment and curation to build exceptional resources for research. The Google partnership promises to open up these resources to a much broader audience, ensuring that they remain accessible and discoverable in a digital age.

Through this agreement, Google will scan and make searchable public domain works as well as copyrighted materials, in a manner consistent with copyright law. For books protected by copyright, a search will yield basic information (such as the book's title and author's name); at most a few lines of text related to the search; and information about book purchase or lending.  Public domain materials can be viewed, searched, or downloaded for printing in their entirety from the Google site and from the Hathi Trust.

 

CIC/Google Government Documents Project

 

The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library is partnering with the Committee for Institutional Cooperation (CIC) and Google in an effort to digitize a comprehensive collection of U.S. Federal Documents.  Digital facsimiles of successfully scanned Federal Documents will be made publicly accessible through Google Book Search, FDSys, and the Hathi Trust Digital Repository.

The project will digitize many of the government documents which were distributed to CIC libraries through the Federal Depository Library Program (FDLP).  Upon completion of that work, the effort will move on to include materials that are unique to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library. The process will largely rely upon a sheet-fed scanning process which produces higher resolution images.  All of the volumes digitized in this manner will have a print duplicate within another CIC library.  Items identified as being unique among the CIC libraries will not be digitized through the sheet-fed scanning process. 

The CIC-Google Government Document Project’s objective is to digitize a copy of all U.S. Federal documents held by CIC libraries and to develop a collective strategy for the retention and preservation of an adequate number of print copies to satisfy user needs.  According to the CIC, the U.S. Federal Documents collection is where their member libraries believe they can achieve efficiencies by better managing the relationship between digital and print resources, with assurances that an adequate number of print copies are available for future use.

“The University of Minnesota and Pennsylvania State University have already been participating in this project,” said Tom Teper, associate university librarian for collections and assistant dean of libraries.  “And, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s Library is proud it was selected as an early contributor soon after the project’s implementation. This is a testament to the University Library’s long-standing commitment to public access to government information and is fully supported by the Illinois State Library, the University Library's FDLP regional depository.”

All of the remaining CIC libraries will participate in the digitization project in stages.

Additional information about the CIC-Google Government Document Project is located at www.cic.net/home/projects/Library/BookSearch/GovDocs.aspx.  

For more information about these digitization efforts at Illinois, please contact Tom Teper at tteper@illinois.edu or 217-244-8755.