THE ISSUES

THE RESPONSE

LINKS


NEW PUBLISHING OPTIONS

OPEN ACCESS

OPEN ACCESS INCREASES IMPACT AND EXPOSURE OF YOUR WORK

By making your work freely available on the web through an open access publisher, you greatly increase your potential audience, and thus the potential impact factor of your research. A 2004 study by Kristin Antelman looked at citations of OA articles in four disciplines at various points in the adoption of OA (philosophy, political science, electrical and electronic engineering, and mathematics). It found that OA articles were cited, on average, 45% more than subscription-only articles in the lowest instance (philosophy), and 91% more in the highest instance (mathematics). The study concluded that "scholars in diverse disciplines are both adopting open access practices and being rewarded for it." (Read the study.)

 

SUBMITTING YOUR WORK TO OPEN ACCESS JOURNALS

Find a Journal

You can use the Directory of Open Access Journals to locate OA journals by field.

Search for information about the journal you're considering publishing in in Journal Info, and it will offer titles of OA journals for you to consider publishing in, instead!

Use Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory, to which the U of Illinois Library subscribes. In the Advanced Search, choose the following:

  • Features: “open access”
  • Serial Type: “scholarly”
  • Price Type: "free"
  • Subject: Click on Index, and choose a subject area (if you want to browse all the journals, regardless of subject, don't do this step)
  • Click on "Search", and a list will be generated by Ulrich's that not only shows which journals are open access, but also which are refereed.

Many publishers are experimenting with hybrid models, whereby the journal itself is not fully open access, but authors may pay a sum of money to make their article open access. Examples of such publishers include American Physical Society, American Society of Plant Biologists, Blackwell, Cambridge University Press, Elsevier, Oxford University Press, Springer, Wiley, etc. But all hybrid plans are not created equal. See the blog entries by Peter Suber and Bill Hubbard.

Funding considerations

OA journals often operate under what is known as an "author pays" model, in which the costs of the journal are paid for at the publication end (in the form of article publishing fees) rather than at the dissemination end (in the form of subscription fees). "Author pays," however, is something of a misnomer:

U of Illinois's institutional membership in alternative publishing organizations means that our faculty's publications are subsidized. More information...

Major research funding bodies like the Wellcome Trust and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute have pledged their support for Open Access, and offer subsidies to their grantees to fund the cost of OA publication. If you are receiving research funds from such an institution, check if they will pay for OA.

Even if you don't have research funding, some OA publishers will waive publication fees when the author cannot afford them. This includes the Public Library of Science, the most successful and prestigious OA publisher to date (more information on their fee policy).

 

REMEMBER - THERE'S A NO-COST WAY TO MAKE YOUR ARTICLES FREELY AVAILABLE TO THE WHOLE WORLD!

Archive your article in the University of Illinois' scholarly archive, IDEALS. Read more.