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Clayton, Robert, Sir (1629-1707) | University of Illinois Rare Book and Manuscript Library

Name: Clayton, Robert, Sir (1629-1707)


Historical Note:

Born at Bulwick, Northamptonshire, England, 29 September 1629, Sir Robert Clayton was a banker, alderman, member of Parliament, knight, and Lord Mayor of London.

He became an apprentice to his uncle, a London scrivener, where he met a fellow apprentice, Alderman John Morris. They became successful businessmen and established the bank, Clayton & Morris Co.

Clayton entered politics and representing several wards as a Whig. He was knighted in 1671. Clayton made a considerable fortune, and on John Morris's death in 1682, inherited considerable wealth. In 1697 he lent the king £30,000 to pay for the army.

He was president of the St Thomas' Hospital in London next to the River Thames opposite the Houses of Parliament. He employed Thomas Cartwright to rebuild the hospital and St Thomas Church nearby.

Robert Clayton was a member of the Scriveners and Drapers Company, an Alderman of Cheap Ward in the City of London (1670-1683), a Sheriff in 1671, Lord Mayor of London (1679-1680), a Member of Parliament for the City of London (1678-1681), Colonel of the Orange Regiment of militia (various times, 1680-1702), President of the Honourable Artillery Company (1690-1703), Commissioner of the Customs (1689-1697), an Assistant to the Royal African Company (1672-1681) and a governor of the Bank of England (1702-1707).

Sir Robert outlived his children and his heir was his nephew, Sir William Clayton.  He died 16 July 1707.

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Clayton, accessed 10/19/06.

http://library-2.lse.ac.uk/archives/handlists/Clayton/m.html, British Library of Political and Economic Science, accessed 10/19/06

Note Author: Lesley Purnell





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