Library Committee Handbook

Executive Committee



Health Information Services Planning Team Report

 

Health Information Services Planning Team Report

 

  18 March 2010

 

Executive Summary

 

The Health Information Services Planning Team was appointed to explore new models for health information services and to align these services to fit within the New Service Model process of the University Library.   The team was charged to:

  1. Articulate needs and strengths of those areas of study on the Urbana campus that depend on health information services. 
  2. Assess the growing overlap and gaps in health information services across Library units, and identify the most promising ways in which the Library can build support for both core and emergent programs.
  3. Involve relevant groups and individuals in the Team's conversations.
  4. Identify exemplars and models to provide the most effective Library services and access to health-related information resources.
  5. Recommend a plan for ongoing assessment of the effectiveness of the new service profile.

In its work the team was mindful of the priority placed on health in both the Campus and Library Strategic Plans as well as the Strategic Goals of the College of Applied Health Sciences.  The following principles and findings emerged to guide specific recommendations for a new health information services model:

 

Current Context for Planning Health Information Services

 

 

§  Core academic programs as well as interdisciplinary programs related to health (such as the i-Health interdisciplinary undergraduate major; the new Masters  in Public Health; the Center on Health, Aging, and Disability) are expanding, and they need new and different types of library services than what can currently be supported by the AHS Library as a self-contained college library.  In keeping with the Library's New Service Model principles, future health  information services should encompass robust space and interdisciplinary collections and services.

 

Future Needs for Health Information Services

 

§  Within the next 5 years health information services require the support of a greater number of FTE professionals in order to meet growing needs for curriculum and research support on the Urbana campus.

§  The UIUC Library must allocate additional recurring funds for collections that support academic research and teaching in the health sciences.   Because many publishers and vendors will not allow joint licensing arrangements (with UIC), UIUC must allocate additional funds to establish its own subscriptions for electronic products.

 

§  In areas where collaboration can be of mutual benefit, the UIUC Library should seek to establish a more cohesive and formal relationship with the UIC Library, in particular, the UIC Library of the Health Sciences - Urbana. 

 

§  The College of Applied Health Sciences faculty and students envision a future service setting that incorporates a strong and vibrant physical space to promote a variety of interactions around information seeking and use in a library setting.  An enduring value of the AHS Library has been a focus on student services and its personal approach to facilitating student and faculty learning/access, a value that should be sustained in any future library serving the health sciences.

 

 

 

It is anticipated that the detailed findings presented in this report should inform the work of the Library's Social & Behavioral Science Planning Team and that membership of this team should include representation from the HISP team.   

 

The existing Health Information Portal (http://www.library.illinois.edu/health/) provides a strong starting point for further development of virtual collections and services.  It is a tangible example of productive collaboration among multiple librarians with an interest in various aspects of health sciences.   

 

The Team considered an assessment and monitoring process for the new configuration of health information services.  While discussion regarding assessment processes was not extensive, the Team felt that a future assessment process should evaluate progress toward the following goals:  (1) Strengthen the ability to provide content in all formats and enhance access to health information.  (2) Strengthen health information services to meet the changing library needs of faculty and students.  (3) Build a stronger and more diverse research capacity for health information.  (4) Provide a common place for faculty, students, and staff focused on a culture of learning about health information.

 

 

Background

 

The Health Information Services Planning Team was appointed to explore new models for health information services and to align these services to fit the general planning processes occurring in the University Library.  The Team built on the Life Sciences Division Spring 2009 discussions (http://www.library.illinois.edu/nsm/lsd/index.html) and monitored the ongoing work this fall of the Biology and Life Sciences Planning Team

(http://www.library.illinois.edu/nsm/biology/index.html).  The Team was also mindful of the priority placed on health in both the Campus and Library Strategic Plans as well as the Strategic Goals of the College of Applied Health Sciences (see Appendix B).  In particular the Library's Strategic Plan (2006) identifies a Center for Health Information Support as one of five strategic initiatives.  The Health Information Services Planning Team was explicitly charged with planning for the future of health-related library services to faculty, students, and practitioners (see the full charge in Appendix A), and more specifically to do the following:

  1. Articulate needs and strengths of those areas of study on the Urbana campus that depend on health information services. 
  2. Assess the growing overlap and gaps in health information services across Library units, and identify the most promising ways in which the Library can build support for both core and emergent programs.
  3. Involve relevant groups and individuals in the Team's conversations.
  4. Identify exemplars and models to provide the most effective Library services and access to health-related information resources.
  5. Recommend a plan for ongoing assessment of the effectiveness of the new service profile.

Process of Developing the Team Report

 

The initial set of meetings were directed at clarifying and explaining the charge, and providing a larger context to understand the charge (Library planning, AHS strategic planning, committee membership, and other planning contexts relevant to disciplines such as nutritional sciences and medicine).  After this initial set of meetings, we divided into two subgroups to address the charge:  one composed of team members who are faculty with expertise in various aspects of the health sciences (Susan Farner, Kinesiology & Community Health; Charissa Lansing, Speech & Hearing Science; Steven Leigh, Anthropology & Surgery; William Stewart, Recreation, Sport and Tourism; Synthia Sydnor, Kinesiology & Community Health; Kelly Anne Tappenden, Food Science & Human Nutrition; Kenneth Wilund, Kinesiology & Community Health) and one composed of team members who are librarians and library staff concerned with health information (Mary Beth Allen, Applied Health Sciences; Wendy Gregory, Applied Health Sciences; Annie Paprocki, Education & Social Sciences; Beth Sandore, AUL; Mary Shultz, Health Sciences; Linda Smith, GSLIS; Greg Youngen, Veterinary Medicine).  Subsequently Allen, Farner, Sandore, Smith, Stewart, and Sydnor worked on integrating findings and developing recommendations for review by the full team.  A draft dated 11 January 2010 was circulated widely for comment and was discussed at an open meeting on 22 January 2010.  Based on feedback received, additional drafts were prepared and discussed by the entire team.  Based on this additional discussion, this final report was prepared for submission to the University Librarian.

 

The faculty subgroup sought to carry out part 1 of our charge:

1.    Articulate needs and strengths.  The result was an annotated list of core and emerging health information service areas and an enumeration of topical categories that fall within core and emerging health information areas of particular relevance to this campus.  This document reflected the collective expertise and experience of members of the faculty group (see Appendix D).

The librarian subgroup sought to carry out parts 2-4 of our charge:

  1. Assess overlap and gaps in health information services  (see Appendices F, G, H, I).
  2. Develop a broad-based understanding of the existing and emerging needs of information users in these allied disciplines (see Appendix E).
  3. Identify exemplars and models (see Appendix J).

The next three sections summarize the work of the two subgroups.  This is followed by recommendations and an enumeration of key principles and findings.

Identification of Needs and Strengths:  The Core and Emerging Curriculum Areas that Shape Health Information Services

The faculty group articulated a rich analysis across health-related disciplines on the Urbana campus for which Library support is needed, and it identified key functions for which faculty turn to the Library for support (see Appendix D).  The core and emerging areas of teaching and research are numerous, and they demonstrate both deep and broad reach of health-related curriculum and research areas on the Urbana campus.   

 

Aging

Leisure behavior

Behavioral health

Lifelong learning

Biomechanics

Mental health

Cancer survivorship

Neuroscience

Community development

Nutrition

Dietetics

Obesity

Disability

Park planning

Diversity

Physical activity

Epidemiology

Physical education

Exercise physiology

Recreation

Health

Rehabilitation

Health care

Speech communication and language science

Health communication

Sport

Health disparities

Substance abuse

Health technologies

Tourism

Hearing

Wellness

Hospitality

 

 

Core and emerging areas of curriculum and research related to Health, Urbana campus

When the faculty subgroup discussed these core and emerging areas with the team, they emphasized the fact that these areas encompassed curriculum and research activities of faculty and students in several colleges -Applied Health Sciences, Liberal Arts and Sciences, ACES, Social Work, Veterinary Medicine-and across several key collaborative programs such as the Center for Health, Aging and Disability, the interdisciplinary Neuroscience PhD program, the Division of Nutritional Sciences, and the new Masters of Public Health program.  The scope of health-related educational programs and research endeavors has expanded significantly on the Urbana campus.  This is further reflected in recent strategic plans for the campus, the College of Applied Health Sciences, and the Library (see Appendix B). The team agreed that the core and emerging areas outlined by the faculty group would be the primary drivers for shaping health information services on the Urbana campus.

The second component of the faculty subgroup's work was to identify key functions that faculty look to the Library to support. The Applied Health Sciences Library (http://www.library.illinois.edu/ahs/) has a long and distinguished history.  It was established in 1949 as the Physical Education Library with the purpose of providing library collections to support activities related to what has become the College of Applied Health Sciences (AHS) (http://www.ahs.illinois.edu).  Since that time, teaching, research, and service related to health have grown beyond the boundaries of AHS, and libraries have evolved dramatically to address many changes, including an emphasis on services rather than collections.  The key functions outlined by the faculty group included a number of new needs that are not currently supported in the AHS Library.  Some are supported elsewhere in the Library, and some are not currently supported in the Library, but are addressed by other campus units.  The functions are identified below, and for more detailed description see Appendix D.  These functions were influenced by the goals listed in this report (pp. 14-15).

 

§  Support for American Sign Language curriculum.  Support includes visual dictionaries, interactive software, access to recorded interviews with members of the Deaf community, and other software packages to study neurolinguistics of sign languages.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

§  Laboratory resource rooms for Speech and Hearing Science programs. The library already collaborates to provide services related to assessment toolkits, and these needs are expected to expand into interactive software for speech, language and hearing analysis and intervention.

 

§  Library as representative of AHS.  The College of AHS identifies strongly with its Library because the units of the college are spread across several buildings on campus, the Library reflects the interdisciplinary breadth of the college, and the Library signifies the narrative of the college within one location.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The faculty's elaboration of core and emerging areas-from the standpoint of scope, and from the standpoint of needed library functions-provided a far-reaching comprehensive foundation for which future planning will build a framework of health information services.  In this context it is also helpful to note the potential service areas identified in the recently completed Biology and Life Sciences Planning Team Report, which included some overlap with the list above, such as Database and Information Management software/applications (http://www.library.illinois.edu/nsm/biology/About_this_project/Biology_Team_Final_Report_20100212.pdf).

Assessment of Gaps and Overlaps; Identification of Exemplars

The subgroup of the full committee comprised of librarians from UIUC and UIC worked concurrently on assessing needs, and identifying library service gaps, overlaps, and model health information service programs at peer institutions. A short survey was distributed to all Library faculty and staff to assess existing demands for health information and associated services, including collections, instruction, and other services; the audiences reached; and any gaps and challenges (summary of results in Appendix F).  In addition health information literacy needs and opportunities were summarized (Appendix G); relevant data were compiled from campus and library sources (Appendix H); and UIUC library web pages were analyzed for coverage of health databases and information services (Appendix I).

The library subgroup used the faculty subgroup's core and emerging areas and needs document as a framework for analyzing these needs.  Appendix E-Health Information Services Planning Grid-represents the group's analysis of what services are currently offered, and what areas of the Library support those services.  In some cases the faculty identified key information functions that are supported outside the AHS Library, and some that are not supported in the Library.   The grid served as a basis for conversation about how the AHS Library and other library units might collaborate to meet needs articulated by the faculty subgroup.

In an effort to identify exemplars of health information service models at other institutions, Mary Beth Allen compiled information on the health-related curriculum and library programs at fourteen U. S. universities (Appendix J).  All but one or two of the programs reviewed have been in existence for over ten years.  Library support for health-related programs roughly mirrors the organization of the college or school. On most campuses that house a medical school, health and related areas are supported through a medical and health sciences library facility (Iowa, Ohio State, Northwestern).  On campuses that do not have a medical school but do offer health-related degrees, library services in this area may be provided in any number of ways that reflect local practice-- through a science library, a life science library, a public health library, a social and behavioral sciences library.    The short profile of the mission, collections, and services of the UIC Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana prepared by Mary Shultz emphasizes the Library's role in serving the faculty, students, and staff of the College of Medicine and the College of Nursing on the Urbana campus (Appendix K).

Analysis of Data, Surveys, and Campus/Library Contextual Information

The team collected and analyzed new data from several sources and existing data collected through periodic Library surveys and annual statistical reporting in both the Library and through the campus Division of Management Information (DMI).   Information was also incorporated from the College of AHS strategic profile, its recent strategic planning process, and from the profiles of other health-related programs of study in the Colleges of ACES, LAS, and in the School of Social Work.  Both campus and Library data indicate that the need for health information services to support both research and learning is increasing on campus, and that this trend will continue, for both core health science fields as well as the interdisciplinary programs that incorporate social science as well as food and human nutrition areas on the Urbana campus. 

Mary Beth Allen compiled a summary that described both gate count and books circulated from the current AHS Library, located on the first floor of the Main Library building, as remaining steady, within the top fifteen highest use departmental library sites on campus (see Appendix H).  Survey participants in the Library's 2004 and 2005 LibQual surveys who indicated the AHS Library was a primary library expressed a strong appreciation for the skilled staff and librarian support.  Yet there is also concern that one professional librarian and two full-time support staff are not sufficient to serve growing health-related information needs.  The Head of the AHS Library currently conducts 25-30 library instruction sessions per year for AHS undergraduate and graduate classes, and has indicated that there is a growing and unmet need for additional library instruction (see Appendix G).  In an informal survey of librarians across Library units the team found that librarians in several other units currently provide public service and/or instructional support for students in health-related areas (see Appendix F). 

Further, comments from survey data in the Library's LibQual surveys and from an informal AHS Joint Student Council discussion conducted by the College of AHS administration in May 2009 underscore the need for new and expanded health-related services and collections.  Student comments noted that existing AHS Library space and hours place limits on effective use of Library collections and services.  The current space cannot accommodate the needs of both those wanting quiet for study and those seeking collaborative space for work on group projects.   Open hours also do not always match students' preferred times for work in the library.  Students who participated in the informal AHS College Joint Student Council discussion in May 2009 indicated that for a combination of these reasons many of them preferred other library and campus spaces for study to the current AHS Library space.

 

 

 

Recommendations

 

Although differing opinions were expressed by team members on how best to meet emerging health information services needs, the recommendations that follow reflect the team's consensus of three key points:  1) campus programs related to health and wellness are changing rapidly; 2) the information needs of a growing community of users on the Urbana campus require an increasing amount of close and continuous interaction among librarians across related disciplines and physical library departments; and 3) the information landscape in these areas is also changing. 

 

The team recognizes that through physical and programmatic integration of health information services with library services and resources in other related disciplines, there is the potential for broader collaboration on collection development, service provision, and stronger outreach through instruction and on grant initiatives.  It is in this context that the team outlined the following recommendations.

 

1.  Foundation

 

The foundation of future health information services on the Urbana campus should be an information service program that is focused on both core academic areas of curriculum and research as well as interdisciplinary areas of curriculum and research in AHS, LAS, ACES, Social Work, and the allied/affiliated programs on campus, such as Campus Recreation, the campus Health and Wellness program, and McKinley Health Center. Librarians representing the subject areas that provide health information services would conceivably work together to re-shape the existing service profile to integrate more fully the disciplines involved.  This may include AHS, Biology, Veterinary Medicine, Biotechnology, Food and Nutrition within ACES, Medicine, Communication, Psychology, Sociology, Social Work, etc.  The Library could redefine the positions of librarians in related areas so that a percentage of each position is devoted to the ongoing provision of services in support of an expanded and cohesive health information program in the UIUC Library.

 

A key challenge is to develop a strategy to provide more comprehensive health information services in a library and campus environment that will be resource-neutral at best. The perspective of the faculty in the College of AHS focuses on the desire to retain distinct and visible health information services and to expand services centered in health sciences by incorporating other related information services (e.g., psychology, social work, anthropology) under a new thematic umbrella of health.  Another perspective is for health to become a strong and equal partner in the Social and Behavioral Science planning effort, seeking to establish a partnership among peers with other related disciplines.  Implementation must consider the most strategic way to position health information services that does justice to the traditions of health sciences on campus, adapts to the growing interdisciplinary nature of health sciences, and is sustainable for the long run.

 

The UIUC Library must allocate additional recurring funds for collections that support academic research and teaching in the health sciences.  The UIUC Library has a strong history of supporting basic science, life science, and social science, as well as other areas of study. However, the collection for human health science, a relatively newer area of study that occupies the "middle ground," between life science and social science, is not adequately supported. Because many publishers and vendors will not allow joint licensing arrangements (with UIC), UIUC must allocate additional funds to establish its own subscriptions for electronic products.  A few examples that are currently needed include:  Anatomy.TV (an interactive human anatomy product); the Cochrane Library (the gold standard in evidence-based health care/systematic reviews/clinical trials) ; and crucial ejournals such as Pediatrics, the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics.

 
The UIUC library has a formal and reciprocal collaboration with the UIC Library of the Health Sciences on the Urbana campus, leveraging the relationship between medicine, health, and wellness programs of study and areas of overlapping research and services.   To facilitate collaboration, the possibility of joint UIC/UIUC appointments for designated librarians should be investigated.  Regardless of appointment status, the librarians can collaborate to shape programs and services for health information.  Online resources which are needed on the Urbana campus  should be identified and where possible further joint licensing pursued with the Chicago campus. It is necessary for the libraries to move in this direction in order for the university to develop a competitive research and educational presence among its peer institutions in these areas.   
 

2. Name

 

A consensus was reached on the HISP Team that health information services should be labeled as a "Library."  The rationale and discussion of this recommendation follows.

 

The team considered thoughtful advice from the AHS College Executive Committee and faculty in their letter of 15 February 2010 (see Appendix C):

 

Names of libraries are not trivial or neutral-- they legitimate, define and illuminate particular fields of studies and subject matter. The name of the library is critical and thus it is important to call on the expertise of the already assembled faculty to choose the best name that reflects identified core values...

 

The AHS College Executive Committee further recommended that the name ought to include the term "library" to signify

 

...a location, books and other informational resources, and a scholarly place-no other term has this set of implications. In addition, the name should be succinct and contain terms that are enduring and easily understood. 

 

The HISP Team agrees with the AHS College Executive Committee and faculty that re-envisioned health information services should be labeled as "Library."  Furthermore, while early conversations concerning the library name sought to identify "wellness" as a key element in the name, the Team determined that the incorporation of "wellness" into the name would be cumbersome and not easily interpreted.  Subsequent to rejecting "wellness" as part of the name, the HISP Team considered and thoroughly discussed the following three names: 

 

Applied Health Sciences Library indicates a strong connection to AHS college leadership in health-related initiatives on campus.  This name also includes niche programs in AHS that are not readily encompassed by the term "health" yet would identify with the College name as the library's name.  This name may not be as inviting for other health-related disciplines across campus to see their fit with a new library that maintains an existing name.  Applied Health Sciences Library would signify the general movement away from individual departmental libraries and toward the development of college-level or school-level libraries.

 

Health Sciences Library is succinct and easily understoodThe name Health Sciences Library is distinct from the AHS Library and therefore reflects a new function, expresses a broad definition of the scope of the library, would be inviting to other campus stakeholders who are connected to health disciplines, is preferred by the AHS Executive Committee as well as AHS faculty on the Team, and aligns with the campus initiative that identifies health as a major theme for teaching, research, and service. The one concern with this name is the potential confusion with the UIC-Library of the Health Sciences - Urbana, that serves the UIC College of Medicine and College of Nursing on the Urbana campus. It was suggested that future endowments might enable the Health Sciences Library to be named by a donor (e.g., "The John and Jane Smith Health Sciences Library"), thus resolving the confusion with the UIC-LHS-U name.

 

Integrated Health and Behavioral Sciences Library is a name put forth as a place holder for another library planning team to consider.  During the course of HISP Team planning, the potential alignment of health information with social and behavioral science information became apparent.  Rather than put forth a prospective permanent name, the decision to name the library should be left for another team.  Specifically, the Integrated Health and Behavioral Sciences Library would be a starting point for the upcoming conversations with a Social and Behavioral Science Planning (SBS) Team.  This latter team will soon be charged to "review Library service to the social and behavioral sciences and to identify opportunities to enhance support for these fields and for allied, applied fields of study."  The outcome of a concerted planning effort across the Social and Behavioral Sciences (SBS) could incorporate the work of the HISP Team that identified core and emerging areas of health and related fields of study.  An SBS team comprised of faculty and librarians from a broad range of SBS disciplines, including strong representation of faculty and librarians from the HISP team, would possess the scope needed to make recommendations for an appropriate library name.  For this reason, some felt it would be premature for the HISP Team to recommend a specific library name at this time. 

 

3. Service Mission and Physical Footprint

 

The vision for the new library would be an integration of the current AHS Library collection scope and services with collections and services that may include related fields, including anthropology, social work, psychology, health communication, nutrition, and other current and emerging health-related topics to form an expanded set of partners in health-related collaborations.  Because health-related programs are expected to grow - both within AHS and in other campus units - an appropriately sized space would be necessary to account for the increased use of health information services.    The recommendation is that the new health sciences library should have a space as large, if not larger, than the current AHS Library in anticipation of addressing the core and emerging areas identified by the faculty subcommittee.  Spatial needs would require desktop computer workstations for student and faculty use related to digital resources including coursework, grant preparation, access to clinical resources, IRB and IACUC materials, and data storage and manipulation. 

 

There were two related perspectives from which to view the recommendation about physical configuration of library space, and both are represented in this report.  For some members of the team, the use of the name "Health Sciences Library" is representative of a strong desire to retain its visibility and program identity, regardless of locations, with the dominant theme being health sciences information services.  This perspective posits Health Sciences as the theme around which other related disciplines' programs and services are shaped and offered.

 

Others on the team view the name as a transitional referent and prefer to focus on developing strong health-related information services through collaboration with equally-significant and related social and behavioral science library services.  This perspective follows from the Integrated Health and Behavioral Sciences Library as a name, and recommends the final determination of physical configuration of space should be saved for another library planning team to consider.

 

The Team considered a variety of possibilities for a physical location, taking into account constraints posed by available library spaces and the Library New Service Models' goal of consolidating service points.  One option considered, but ultimately judged less desirable, was the possibility of integration as part of a Life Sciences hub in the ACES Library.  Given the current emphasis of curricula in AHS and the AHS Library collection, there was not much support for this scenario among the members of the team. There were clearly preferences for a central campus location to assert the importance of health to the university community and create a sense of place regarding the growing number of students and faculty in health-related programs

Possibilities include alternative sites on the first floor of the Main Library building (http://www.fs.uiuc.edu/ada/0041Plan1.html).  The following options were considered:

 

1) Business & Economics Library (http://www.library.illinois.edu/bel/) on the south side.

 

The option to occupy space in the Business & Economics Library (BEL, http://www.library.illinois.edu/bel) on the south side (assuming a significant part of it will be vacated) holds the highest priority for half of the HISP Team members.  Dean Tanya Gallagher and the AHS Executive Committee also preferred this location (see Appendix C). An important rationale is that health information services should not be re-organized as a "discrete" or "integrated" presence in a larger physical library space such as ESSL.  This recommendation (that health information services library occupy BEL) was largely guided by the findings of the HISP team that point to the growing importance of "health" foci in the University's research and teaching.  Because this space is being newly established, all library staff will be making adjustments to accommodate the new work environment and new set of collections and services, including resource rooms for small groups and study space for individuals.  Information services for related subject areas across the library and campus would be invited to partner in this newly configured space.

 

2) Current AHS Library space.

 

The option to occupy the current AHS Library space (http://www.library.illinois.edu/ahs/) offers attractive features, but would require renovation much like the option above to account for core and emerging areas, including enhanced computer workstations for student and faculty use to provide access to digital resources. This option also was considered acceptable by the AHS Executive Committee and the AHS faculty on the HISP Team, primarily because it would evolve as a library devoted to health information services, and could serve collaborative functions with the addition of the most relevant behavioral science disciplines, such as psychology and social work.  However, the concern with this option is that if renovations were not significant enough, then there would be questions about the ability to implement an expanded mission and enhanced services of the new health sciences library.  In particular, it may not be welcoming to other partners in health-related disciplines, and could inhibit the growth of expanding collaborations for campus health sciences.  It offers a smaller overall space (in square footage) than the proposed BEL space, so growth might be constrained.  However, if the bulk of the collection was shelved in the adjoining book stacks space to the south, the remaining library space would be freed for user services.

 

3) Education & Social Science Library (http://www.library.illinois.edu/edx/) on the north side

(including such subject areas as anthropology, psychology,  sociology, and social work).

 

The option to occupy space in the Education & Social Science Library (http://www.library.illinois.edu/essl/) leads to the new health sciences library essentially becoming a library within a library.  This option moves the new health sciences library into one of the two large rooms of the current ESSL.  The current stacks and resources would be moved elsewhere or integrated as part of the new configuration, and space needs to be enhanced similar to the options above.  There would be partnerships developed due to affiliation with the social and behavioral sciences.  This option would leave some library staff and resources in their same place even though the library and its functions would change, leaving questions on the ability to implement the broader mission and enhanced services of the health sciences library.  The AHS Executive Committee and the AHS faculty on the HISP Team considered this option unacceptable.

 

4) Integrated Health and Behavioral Sciences Library (leave discussion of the library location to a future planning team)

 

This option saves the choice of location for a future library planning team.  Based on the same rationale as the name, the potential alignment of health information with social and behavioral science information suggests it is premature to recommend a location for a new health information services library.  Leaving the location decision for the SBS Team seeks to position health sciences to be an equal partner with some subset of the social and behavioral sciences in the provision of newly-configured services in the east wing of the Main Library.  The placement of the health science library would be a point of discussion only after commonalities and strategies for growth have been explored in conversation with the SBS Team. The context for placement of a health sciences library within an SBS planning effort seeks to establish a strong and equal partnership among other related disciplines. 

 

4.      Health Information Portal

 

The existing Health Information Portal (http://www.library.illinois.edu/health/) provides a strong starting point for further development of virtual collections and services.  It is a tangible example of productive collaboration among multiple librarians with an interest in various aspects of health sciences.  Possible enhancements include implementation of "views" that are matched to the needs of various groups, such as undergraduate students.  The topics encompassed by this portal are a strong reminder of the multi-faceted nature of "health information", but further expansion to include topics like recreation and leisure, health communication, and disability is needed.

 

5.      On-Going Assessment of the Effectiveness of the New Service

 

The Team considered an assessment and monitoring process for the configuration of the new health sciences library.  The discussion regarding assessment processes was not extensive, and appears to fit more appropriately under an implementation team's purview.  However the Team felt that goals were important to identify, and that a future assessment process should evaluate progress toward goals.  The following four goals are provided as part of the mission of the new health sciences library.  In addition to the goals, strategies are identified under each goal to guide the activities of the library and are essentially the core and emerging areas identified by the faculty sub-group.  In the cases of both goals and strategies, the AHS Library and many other library units are already undertaking several of them. 

 

Goal 1.  Strengthen the ability to provide content in all formats and enhance access to health information

 

 

Goal 2.  Strengthen health information services to meet the changing library needs of faculty and students

 

 

Goal 3.  Build a stronger and more diverse research capacity for health information

 

 

Goal 4.  Provide a common place for faculty, students, and staff focused on a culture of learning about health information

 

 

Summary of Principles and Key Findings

 

Based on the team's data gathering and deliberations, the following findings and principles emerged to guide specific recommendations for a new health information services model:

 

 Current Context for Planning Health Information Services

 

 

§  Core academic programs as well as interdisciplinary programs related to health (such as the i-Health interdisciplinary undergraduate major; the new Masters  in Public Health; the Center on Health, Aging, and Disability) are expanding, and they need new and different types of library services than what can currently be supported by the AHS Library as a self-contained college library.  In keeping with the Library's New Service Model principles, future health  information services should encompass robust space and interdisciplinary collections and services.

 

Future Needs for Health Information Services

 

§  Within the next 5 years health information services require the support of a greater number of FTE professionals in order to meet growing needs for curriculum and research support on the Urbana campus.

§  The UIUC Library must allocate additional recurring funds for collections that support academic research and teaching in the health sciences.   Because many publishers and vendors will not allow joint licensing arrangements (with UIC), UIUC must allocate additional funds to establish its own subscriptions for electronic products.

 

§  In areas where collaboration can be of mutual benefit, the UIUC Library should seek to establish a more cohesive and formal relationship with the UIC Library, in particular, the UIC Library of the Health Sciences - Urbana. 

 

§  The College of Applied Health Sciences faculty and students envision a future service setting that incorporates a strong and vibrant physical space to promote a variety of interactions around information seeking and use in a library setting.  An enduring value of the AHS Library has been a focus on student services and its personal approach to facilitating student and faculty learning/access, a value that should be sustained in any future library serving the health sciences.

 

 

 

 

Appendix A. Health Information Services Planning Team Charge

 

There is a critical mass of researchers at Illinois who are developing programs ranging from health care policy to the biological determinants of diseases.  They need comprehensive, timely, and reliable information to incorporate into their solutions.  This information must be gleaned from diverse disciplines, including biology, social and behavioral sciences, technology and computer science, informatics, education, nutrition, health economics, health policy as well as allied disciplines such as veterinary medicine.  In early 2009 librarians in Applied Health Sciences, Life Sciences, and Social Sciences library service programs identified the need for the Library to provide a more comprehensive approach to providing health information services to scholars across multiple disciplines on campus.    Although the Library's Health information portal is a growing nexus for vital information, scholars and practitioners who work with increasingly disparate information resources need different kinds of information support than they did 20, 10, or even 5 years ago .  The Health Information Services Planning Team is charged with planning for the future of health-related library services to faculty, students, and practitioners. The Health Information Services Planning team is charged to do the following:

1. Articulate needs and strengths: Identify those areas of study on the Urbana campus that depend on health information services.  Articulate the needs and strengths of both core and emerging areas of study, including free-standing and interdisciplinary programs in "theme" areas such as health management of chronic diseases and disabilities, assessment of public health delivery systems, prevention programs, and health policy.  Illinois currently sponsors several health-related initiatives, including the iHealth initiative, and the Family Resiliency Center, the Center for Health, Aging and Disability, the interdisciplinary Neuroscience PhD program, the new Master's of Public Health program, and various other initiatives in which a critical mass of faculty and staff are engaged.

2. Assess overlap and gaps: Assess the growing overlap and gaps in services that are complementary to health information that exists with library programs in the life, medical and social sciences, and identify the most promising ways in which the Library can build support for both core and emergent programs.

3. Involve relevant groups and individuals in the Team's conversations to develop a broad-based understanding of the existing and emerging needs of information users in these allied disciplines
 
4. Identify exemplars and models
: Identify how and where (related to other service areas in the University Library) to provide the most effective Library services and access to information resources to all disciplines and communities that focus on health-related research, learning,  and practice  in the Illinois campus and outreach communities.  Make recommendations for the kinds of staffing, physical footprint, and service programs that would enable the University Library to achieve this vision.

5. Recommend a plan for ongoing assessment of the effectiveness of the new service profile.

6. Author a report outlining a proposed service profile for health information services to the University Librarian and Dean of Libraries by December 15, 2009.

 

Appendix B.  The Strategic Planning Context

1. University of Illinois 2007 Strategic Plan Progress Report  (p. 17)

http://www.uillinois.edu/president/strategicplan/pdfs/2007-Progress-Report_low-res.pdf

 

Goal III: Breakthrough Knowledge and Innovation

 

Identifies the following as one of three key campus initiatives:

 

2. 2008 Strategic Plan Progress Report (p. 44-45)

http://strategicplan.illinois.edu/annualreport08/index.html

The Health and Wellness Initiative will unify diverse campus resources and will partner with the external community.  It will bring the expertise in the social and behavioral sciences found in colleges such as Applied Health Sciences, Education, Social Work, and Liberal Arts and Sciences to bear on national public health priorities regarding vulnerable populations.

 

The Division of Biomedical Sciences provides a single portal for internal and external communications and the infrastructure required to translate Illinois' basic strengths in science and engineering into innovative solutions for human health.

 

3. UIUC Library Strategic Plan (May 2006, p. 23)

http://www.library.illinois.edu/export/lsd/.../library_strategic_plan_2006.pdf

 

Identifies Center for Health Information Support as one of five strategic initiatives.

The overall goal would be to:

Organize the Library's research capabilities, content, expertise, and services into the Center for Health Information Support, which will serve as the preeminent source of information for the diverse array of disciplines that revolve around health and health professions.

 

Because collections and expertise are distributed among several libraries (ACES, Applied Life Studies, Biology, Biotechnology, Chemistry, Education and Social Science, Engineering, and Veterinary Medicine), there is little cohesion in the presentation of content, expertise, or services.  There is no unified place, either physical or virtual, to which users can go.

We will develop a unified virtual place that brings together information that supports basic, applied, and translational research activities on campus.

 

Specific goals

1. Create a unified web presence for health and allied health information.

[Health Information Portal: http://www.library.illinois.edu/health/]

2. Identify and acquire access to critical information resources

3. Build partnerships with Extension and other units

 

4. Strategic Goals of the College of Applied Health Sciences

 

  1. Provide national leadership in all AHS disciplines
  2. Strengthen education and academic excellence

Strategies include:

Develop undergraduate interdisciplinary degree in Health [http://ihealth.illinois.edu/]

Implement Master of Public Health program [http://www.mph.illinois.edu/]

Develop online offerings-Master of Science in Recreation, Sport and Tourism [http://global.uillinois.edu/recreation-programs/master-of-science-in-recreation-sport-and-tourism/]

  1. Increase and improve facilities
  2. Increase student access
  3. Lead interdisciplinary health, aging, and disability research, education, and outreach on campus

Strategies include:

Campus Health & Wellness Initiative [http://www.provost.illinois.edu/committees/health_initiative.html]

Center for Health, Aging and Disability [http://chad.illinois.edu/]

 

5. National Context for Development of New Academic Programs

 

The demand for professionals ready to work in applied health fields vastly exceeds the supply of current graduates, both in the state and across the nation (see Bureau of Labor Statistics at http://www.bls.gov/ for top 10 areas of most rapid employment growth, 7 of which are in health-related fields). Societal demographics will continue to contribute to this need as the population ages.

National and state demographic trends predict unprecedented increases in the number of older individuals and persons with disabilities for the foreseeable future.  In addition, health-related difficulties associated with a range of societal trends and conditions, such as inactivity, obesity and diabetes, create increased professional opportunities in areas such as health behavior change, wellness promotion and disability prevention. One of the consequences of these demographic shifts is a substantial increase in the need for students trained in health-related sciences and for the advancement of the knowledge base underlying the delivery of those services.  

The health needs of a diverse society are best served by individuals who possess interdisciplinary competence, who are prepared to study and apply knowledge across traditional fields of knowledge. The same holds for meeting the needs of a population whose health can be improved with carefully guided behavioral change.

 

Appendix C.  Letter from AHS College Executive Committee, 15 February 2010

DATE:          February 15, 2010

 

TO:                 Linda C. Smith, Chair, HISP Committee

 

FROM:           AHS Executive Committee (Ron Chambers, Kim Collins, Tanya Gallagher, Bill Goodman, Kim Graber, Sara Kelley, Eddie McAuley, Kim Shinew, Bill Stewart, Monika Stodolska, Ken Watkin)

 

SUBJECT:     Health Information Services Planning (HISP) Report Comments

 

The College of Applied Health Sciences Executive Committee consists of elected representatives that serve as an advisory group to the Dean. After carefully reading and discussing the Health Information Services Planning (HISP) report that was dated January 11, 2010, the committee has prepared a response that unanimously reflects their perspectives.  The comments of the Executive Committee are directed at two primary areas of concern:

 

The Executive Committee appreciates the opportunity to provide input on library planning; values the collegiality of the planning process; and respects the care taken by HISP Team to gather resources and review health information service provisions at the University of Illinois.

 

 

Name for new library:

 

Names of libraries are not trivial or neutral-they legitimate, define and illuminate particular fields of studies and subject matter.  The name of the library is critical and thus it is important to call on the expertise of the already assembled faculty to choose the best name that reflects identified core values.  Naming should not be left to the Library Executive Committee or an implementation team.

 

Most importantly, we hold that "Library" needs to be part of the name of any re-configured AHS Library.  A library implies a location, books and other informational resources, and a scholarly place - no other term has this set of implications.  In addition, the name should be succinct and contain terms that are enduring and easily understood.  We focused our attention on the following two options because they are the two names that correctly articulate the type of library we envision.

 

Applied Health Sciences Library.  The new service model has resulted in re-configured campus libraries to align with colleges and schools, and this suggested title conforms to this practice.  The name leaves no doubt that the library is directly connected with college programs.  The newly developed programs in AHS and the metrics of the AHS strategic plan, indicate that the college will be growing in both students and faculty, suggesting the need for direct links between college programs and informational resources and services.  Given that the college is already interdisciplinary, an expanded breadth of topics and resources (called for Appendix C) would fit well under this name; although the extent to which other health-related disciplines see their fit may not be clear.  Lastly, there are certain niche programs in the college that fit well under the AHS name but would not fit under other names related to health sciences (i.e., tourism management).

 

Health Sciences Library.  Health sciences involves several disciplines on campus. The name would be an indication that the library consists of more programs than only those contained in AHS.  It reflects the central position of health sciences on campus and encourages those from other disciplines to better understand their role in health. This option would be the logical name and the preferred option of the AHS Executive Committee, but we are sensitive to this name being conflated with the Library of the Health Sciences (LHS).  To reduce confusion, we feel comfortable retaining the name Applied Health Sciences Library and respect the distinction between the traditions of both libraries. 

 

Physical location for new library (in order of preference):

 

Option #1: The new health sciences library would establish itself in the current space of the Business and Economics Library (BEL).  This scenario assumes the BEL will vacate its current location, or vacate one of the two major rooms it occupies.  Collections and services related to social work, psychology, nutrition, and other health-related topics (see Appendix C of report) will be invited to move to this new library and join an expanded set of partners in health-related collaborations.  Because health-related programs are expected to grow - both within AHS and in other campus units - an appropriately sized space would be necessary to account for the increased use of health information services.  The space needs to be enhanced to include desktop computer workstations for student and faculty use related to digital resources including coursework, grant preparation, access to clinical resources, IRB and IACUC materials, and data storage and manipulation.  Its central campus location asserts the importance of health to the university community and creates a sense of place regarding the growing number of students and faculty in health-related programs.  Because this space is being newly established, all library staff will be making adjustments to accommodate the new work environment and new set of collections and services, including resource rooms for small groups and study space for individuals.  The proximity to the ESSL suggests there will be natural partnerships developed for services shared amongst the two libraries.

 

Option #2:  Remain in the current space of the AHS Library.  The current space would require renovation much like the option above to account for core and emerging areas (see Appendix C of report), including enhanced computer workstations for student and faculty use to provide access to digital resources. Our concern with this option is the lack of a major change that would leave questions about the ability to implement an expanded mission and enhanced services of a health sciences library.  In particular, it may not be welcoming to other partners in health-related disciplines, and could inhibit the growth of expanding collaborations for campus health sciences. 

 

Two other possibilities were considered but were deemed unacceptable.  (1) Establishing the new health sciences library within one of the two major rooms of a newly-configured Social and Behavioral Sciences Library in the current Education and Social Sciences Library (ESSL) was considered.  The concerns with this option were the decreased visibility of health sciences configured as a component of a larger Social and Behavioral Sciences Library.  In addition the physical space would be inadequate for the core and emerging areas of health information services.  (2) The second option reviewed and considered unacceptable was for the new health sciences library to become part of the ACES Library.  The concerns with this option were the decreased visibility of health sciences configured as part of information services for agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences.  The large size and breadth of informational resources at the ACES Library would overtake any niche devoted to health sciences. 

 

cc:  Paula Kaufman, University Librarian

 

Appendix D.


CORE AND EMERGING HEALTH INFORMATION SERVICE AREAS

Compiled by William Stewart in collaboration with Susan Farner, Charissa Lansing, Steven Leigh, Synthia Sydnor, Kelley Anne Tappenden, and Kenneth Wilund

Accreditation of academic programs:

Each academic unit of the college has at least one program accredited by a professional organization, and includes clinical certification.  Although the majority of accreditation standards are directed at the content of coursework, they also have criteria to evaluate library resources and services.  The accredited programs at the undergraduate level include the B.S. in Recreation, Sport and Tourism (concentration in Recreation Management) by the National Recreation and Park Association, the B.S. in Kinesiology (concentration in teacher education) by the Illinois State Board of Education, and the B.S. in Athletic Training by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education.  At the graduate level, the M.A. in Speech-Language Pathology by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, the M.A. in Speech-Language Pathology is also licensed by the State of Illinois as a type 73 certification, and the Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) is also accredited by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and the M.S. in Rehabilitation by the Council on Rehabilitation Education.  Within the coming year, the Masters of Public Health program will be under-going their initial certification assessment by Council on Education for Public Health.

 

American Sign Language curriculum:  As ASL grows it is vital to have a resource room in which students could have access to visual dictionaries, practice with conversation using interactive software, access to recorded interviews with member of the Deaf community to learn about Deaf culture, and use of software packages to study the neurolinguistics of sign languages.

 

Data storage and manipulation:

Coping with large biomedical datasets requires innovation in health information service delivery.  Storing genomic datasets, manipulating them for analysis, and collaborating with other institutions is an emerging area of health sciences.  Partnering with ATLAS, informatics, and other units and institutions is an expectation due to the requirements of large health-based datasets.

 

Digital resources:

Most faculty and student use of library information resources is conducted online via web interfaces.  Journal articles are downloaded electronically, and when requested books, digital version of books are used or hard copies are mailed to campus addresses.  Use of digital information sources is expected to increase, including accessing information from other institutions.

 

Enhanced access to clinical resources:

Clinical trials play significant roles in health science teaching, research, and service missions.  Improved access to clinical resources for health-related research and professional service is expected.  Numerous AHS faculty currently rely on resources, materials, tests, and diagnostics for their work, reliance on sources such as the Cochrane Library is expected to increase and should be cultivated by the campus library.

 

Grants and contracts preparation:

Preparing external grants and contracts is a significant part of health science teaching, research, and service missions.  Resources and information services are necessary to promote training grants for students. Agencies such as the NIH are favoring institutions that have social networking resources that connect students with the array of researchers in a given field.  In addition, the library web portal needs to have information and services directed at grant resources partitioned by various health topics, including access to successful proposals approved by NIH, NSF, and other agencies that are part of the public domain, and also access to health-related patents, disclosures, and licenses.

 

Increased collaboration with UIC's Library of Health Sciences (LHS):

Although UIUC faculty and students have access to LHS resources and journals, they need to physically be inside the LHS using an LHS computer to gain access to electronic resources.  For other health-related information resources, faculty and students have access from their own desktops.  There are needs to identify the gaps (e.g., joint licensing) in campus health-related information resources and services, and for the campus Library to work jointly with LHS to fill gaps and make the user experience as seamless as possible.  In other words, users should perceive an integrated UIUC-UIC collection of resources and services.

 

Interdisciplinary programs related to health:

Health is being redefined from biomedical to a broader vision that includes the six dimensions of wellness:  environmental, emotional, intellectual, physical, social, and spiritual well-being.  Several new programs have been established on campus aligning with this broader definition of health.

IRB and IACUC requirements:

Institutional Review Boards and Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees are expected to become more sensitive to issues related to trust and security of health datasets.  Information resources and services that facilitate training of human and animal subjects protocol, and provide assistance in meeting various kinds of IRB and IACUC criteria are emerging areas of need.  The demand for tutorials and educational materials on research ethics for faculty, staff, and students is expected to increase given current pressures to integrate instruction and training on ethics into research programs.

 

Laboratory resource rooms:

Several SHS courses would benefit from a centralized effort for laboratories for use in interactive software for head and neck dissection; phonological, lexical, syntactic, grammatical analysis software packages; speech, language, and hearing assessment and intervention materials.  Although there are labs for faculty research, there are currently not any student labs for this function with SHS.  Assessment toolkits for schools are already an appreciated part of the AHS Library services, and these type of toolkits (in an expanded form of a lab) is an anticipated need.

 

Library as representative of AHS:

AHS units are spread across several buildings on campus, and these buildings do not have a strong identity as being part of AHS.  For example, Huff Hall is known by most people as the gym where varsity volleyball, wrestling, and gymnastics perform.  For AHS tours and other introductions of people to the college, the AHS Library is generally a starting point for such events. The current physical space of the AHS Library has served an important function that reflects the pioneering history of the college (e.g., birthplace of sport psychology, sport history, sport anthropology, exercise physiology) as well as the longstanding interdisciplinary breadth of the college regarding health, aging, and disability within one location.

 

Library as state-of-the-art location for health information:

A state-of-the-art health information library functions as a scholarly commons that brings together in one location access to health information, health information services, and library staff with expertise in health information resources. Exhibitions for the campus community that reflect health information are part of the state-of-the-art for health information services.

 

Library as sense of place:

AHS has a history of attracting students from under-represented groups, including people with disability, African-American, and Latino populations.  Social networks, personalization of the university for undergraduate student experiences, and having a place to call one's own has been an important part of the AHS strategy to recruit and retain students from all walks of life, including under-represented populations.  For many students and AHS alumni, the AHS Library has served as a study location that provided a sense of place.

 

Library as small group meeting area:

Numerous classes in AHS require small group activities that include accessing resources, referencing material, and coordinating across disciplines.  These small groups require a place to work, exchange ideas and discuss, with access to information sources, specialist expertise to facilitate access by undergraduate students.

 

Online access:

New forms of teaching, research, and service are being implemented that require accessing information online.  The new online M.S. in the Department of Recreation, Sport, and Tourism established in Fall, 2008, currently has 100 students enrolled.  There are several courses in this program that require health information, and would need services to access such information.  The number of students, courses, and outreach opportunities related to health information services is expected to grow, and involvement of library staff with class instruction will expand.

 

Outreach and public engagement for health:

The 2007 Campus Strategic Plan calls for faculty who will transform the world, conquer the challenges of the 21st century, provide a campus environment that promotes health, justice, and prosperity locally and globally. To promote such global health, the health information services portal will need to partner with other libraries and external organizations related to poor and developing areas to lend support to local community approaches to improving health.  The expansion of global digital health information access many be accomplished through various partnerships (e.g., Carnegie, World Health Organization, Gates Foundation).

 

Web interface designed for multiple users and multiple purposes:

There are many users and purposes for people of the campus community to access health sciences web pages.  The portal needs to be constructed to allow users to sort themselves out and not overload them with choices.  Particularly for undergraduate students who want basic information about health for class purposes, the health sciences web portal needs to be inviting and encourage them to access information.  Other students may be sophisticated in their ability to select options from a health sciences web page, and may require advanced access to health related resources.  The web portal should be able to handle a variety of student users in inviting and encouraging ways.  Faculty and staff will be associated with an array of uses and purposes, and the web portal should be inviting, encouraging, and useful for them also.  The Center for Health, Aging, and Disability is a significant player in the uses and users of interdisciplinary health information services. 

CORE AND EMERGING HEALTH INFORMATION

Aging:

lifespan, public health, medicine, disability studies, mobility, assistive technology, independent living, healthy communities, retirement, cardiovascular conditioning

 

Biomechanics:

motor performance, human movement, ergonomics, neuromuscular system

 

Cancer survivorship:

psychology, medicine, employment, care-giving, chronic pain, diagnosis, therapy

 

Community development

healthy communities, sustainable development, rural communities, agricultural tourism, community recreation and leisure, festivals and event management

 

Dietetics:

dietary bioactive components, biochemical and molecular nutrition, toxicology

 

Disability:

physical, cognitive, psychiatric disability, athletes with disability, adapted sports, learning disability, Paralympics, special Olympics, independent living, assistive technologies, urban design, voice activated technology, visual impairment, multiple sclerosis,

 

Diversity

multiculturalism, race, ethnicity, gender, social class, persons with disability, immigration, identity, white privilege, transnationalism, African-American culture, Latino culture, socio-demographics changes, under-served populations

 

Epidemiology

medicine, veterinary medicine, public health, disease, illness, food environments, vulnerable populations, epigenetics of disease

 

Exercise physiology:

Cardiovascular health, metabolic disorders, gait and balance, lifestyle modifications, motor control, psycho-physiology, immunology

 

Health:

literacy, community health, public health, mental health, social well-being, wellness, college student health, health policy

 

Health care:

policy, administration, law, community health, organization, business

 

Health disparities:

feminism, critical theory, gendered behavior, leisure as resistance, power differentials, participatory action research, health disparities, social justice, empowerment, social responsibility, racial and gender inequalities, inter-racial contact

 

Health technologies:

Health informatics, medical records, healthcare information systems, biomedical datasets, prosthetic devices, assistive technology, rehabilitative support, rehabilitation engineering, assessment and intervention technology, biomedical engineering, health promotion monitoring systems, independent living design

 

Hearing:

audiology, hearing disorders, auditory processing, deafness, hearing loss, tinnitus, sensory prosthetic devices, rehabilitative audiology

 

Hospitality:

hotel management, reservation demand and forecasting, hotel revenue management, marketing

 

Leisure behavior:

Constraints, family leisure, play, intrinsic motivation, outdoor recreation, motherhood, child development, lifespan, deviant behavior, philosophy of leisure, chronic illness, aging, leisure of care-givers, quality of life

 

Life-long learning:

Learning across the lifespan, alternate university, non-traditional student, global campus, civic engagement, service-based learning

 

Neuroscience:

Neural substrates of speech, language, and hearing, neural plasticity, neuro-linguistics, cognitive functioning, auditory processing, speech and motor control, fMRI imaging, perceptual learning, cross modal processing, traumatic brain injury, psychoacoustics, tinnitus, vestibular balance, lexical and phonological development, hearing aids

 

Nutrition:

bone and body composition, metabolism, food safety, education, community nutrition, human and clinical nutrition, animal nutrition, consumer acceptance, professional aspects of nutritional practice

 

Obesity:

physical activity, nutrition, public health, medicine, media influence

 

Park planning:

Landscape change, open space, stakeholder involvement, federal lands, wilderness, natural resource management, ecological restoration, volunteerism, land management, trail development, environmental design, park districts

 

Physical activity:

kinesiology, public health, disparities, neighborhood design, urban planning, attitude and behavior, physical activity and the humanities/arts, physical activity disparities, livable communities, walking, trails,

 

Physical education:

pedagogy, child development, play, children's wellness, obesity, teacher education programs, school environments

 

Recreation:

programming, community, citizen involvement, needs assessment, physical activity, youth, at-risk populations, physical activity, play, obesity, human resources and personnel management, virtual recreation

 

Rehabilitation:

Community health, persons with disability, temporary disability, assistive technology, personal assistant,

 

Speech communication and language science:

Communication disorders, cleft palate, craniofacial anomalies, head and neck oncology, genetic disorders, stuttering, dysphasia, illiteracy, second language learning, vocal abuse, impairment, developmental language delay, autism, aphasia, apraxia, specific language impairment

 

Sport:

Marketing, economics, finance, community, discrimination in sports, inequality in sport, corporate sports, sport labor economics, athletic administration, stakeholders in sport, legal aspects, intercollegiate sports, sports nutrition, sport geography, transnational sport

 

Tourism:

planning, mass media, sustainability, heritage protection, development, marketing, consumer culture, entertainment, destination management, travel behavior, neighborhood, state and national policy

Wellness
stress reduction and management, sociology, community and global health, emotional and social well-being, mental health, nutritional aspects of wellness

Appendix E: Health Information Services Planning Grid

 

 

Service

Existing
in AHS Library

Existing
in Library

New
AHS Library

New
Other Library

New Partnership extra-Library

Collection development and selection for AHS & related subjs.

P

 

 

 

 

Non-circulating, browsable print serials available in AHS Library

P

 

 

 

 

Circulating books from AHS Library

P

 

 

 

 

Walk-up reference service

P

 

 

 

 

Classroom Instruction sessions

P

P

 

 

 

Health info. Portal updates (personalize Lib. Gateway too)

P

P

 

 

 

Tutorials/libguides

P

P

 

 

 

Collection processing/maintenance

P

P

 

 

 

Accreditation & Library

P

 

 

 

 

American Sign Language resource room

 

 

 

P

P

 

Data storage & manipulation

P

 

 

P

IDEALS,Scholarly Commons

GSLIS, NCSA, CITES, ATLAS

 Digital resources & online access

P

P

 

P

 

 Enhanced access to clinical resrcs. (Med. Textbks & more ejnls).

P

 

P

P

 

Grant/research information

 

 

savvy  researcher

IRIS, Schol. Comm..

 

 

P

 

 

 

 

POVCR

eScience eScholarship

 

 

Bibapp

 

P

 

 

P

ScholarlyCommons, L.if Sci. Data Lib;n.

 

Interdisciplinary needs of iHealth, MPH

 

 

P

P

P

IRB-training, support, HSR & AS compliance

 

 

P

P

POVCR

Lab resource rooms

 

 

 

P

P

Library AHS focal point; small groups; "sense of own place"

P

P

 

P

P

 

Existing AHS:  existing service provided by the AHS library.

Existing in Library:  existing service supported outside of the AHS library, but in a Library unit.

New AHS Library: a new service, specific to AHS clientele, that would be desirable to clientele of the AHS library.

New other library:  a new service that might be offered by the Library and would likely be of interest to Library users across a number of units.

New partnership extra-library:  a new service, program, or space allocation that includes a partnership with one or more campus units outside the Library.

 

 

Appendix F HISP Library Survey Responses

Summary of Responses to Survey of Library Units on Health Information Services

Results compiled 11/16/09 by Linda C. Smith

 

  1. My unit regularly receives reference requests for health-related information in the following subject areas:

 

(AHS) All aspects of health and wellness, including health promotion, health administration/policy, global health, epidemiology, prevention of chronic diseases/conditions, public health, community health, HIV/Aids, wellness and development over the lifespan, aging, disability, traumatic brain injury, childhood language development and associated  disorders, communication disorders caused by stroke and other disabling conditions, aphasia, dysphasia,  neuroscience of language and speech, cognition and language/speech, blindness, deafness, cochlear implants, hearing disorders, hearing aids, American Sign Language, stuttering, cerebral palsy, down syndrome, ADHD, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, movement disorders, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, rehabilitation counseling, disability and education/career opportunities, assistive technology, health statistics, health data, demography of health/aging, Latino/a health literacy, child health, nutrition, sports medicine, athletic training/conditioning, injuries, cardiovascular rehabilitation, human biomechanics, gait analysis, motor control and development, balance, body/bone composition, physical activity, exercise, fitness, obesity, motivation and exercise adherence, role of exercise (relative to menopause, aging, memory, learning, cognition), exercise immunology, exercise psychology, exercise neuroscience, kinesmetrics, exercise psychophysiology, neurocognitive kinesiology,  therapeutic recreation, healthy communities, leisure/park planning for health across lifespan, healthy lifestyle, all sports as exercise/for health benefit


From undergraduate students: above subjects in writing a term paper, finding peer-reviewed journal articles

From graduate students: above subjects in literature review, writing a thesis/dissertation, teaching a course
From faculty/staff: above subjects in research, teaching, writing grant proposals
From the general public: Yes, but to a lesser extent than from our primary UIUC academic clientele.  Subjects are usually personal health issues, or those of loved ones.

 

Other libraries

(Commun) From undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty:  health communication, drug advertising, birth control comm and advertising

(Reference) Most often from undergraduate students and the general public

(VM) From undergraduate students: Occasionally, 1-2 requests a month
From graduate students:  Mainly CVM students
From faculty/staff: Some.  Mostly CVM but some ACES (Animal Sci)
From the general public: 1-3 requests a month from veterinarians and the general public

 

(LIS) From graduate students:  medical librarianship, medical/health reference sources

 

(Chem) Some of our patrons are studying for medicine, pharmacy, and other health-related careers. Other patrons may explore biochemistry or nuclear magnetic resonance related to human health, for example. Their reference requests reflect these interests.
From the general public: These inquiries do not seem to relate directly to health except for toxicity information.

 

(Education and Social Sciences) From undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty/staff

 

(Business)  From undergraduates, graduate students, and faculty/staff

 

  1. My unit provides health-related instruction and instructional materials in the following modes of delivery.  Indicate subject areas addressed by each and note modes of delivery where demand is growing:

 

(AHS) One-on-one: all subject areas above are included in one-on-one instruction in the unit; also using online catalog, databases, library web site, Health Info Portal, other print and online sources; a great deal of one-on-one for undergraduate assignments
Group sessions organized by the library: I occasionally offer a specialized session on a topic, like interlibrary loan; I also have organized sessions on Refworks and Data sources for AHS students (utilizing expertise of other staff in the Library)
Course-integrated sessions: unit provides an average of 30 course-integrated sessions per academic year in kinesiology, community health, speech & hearing science
LibGuides: LibGuides aren't accessible for people with disabilities, so I don't use them.  Instead, I offer subject guides (via Library CMS) on the unit web page.  Topics:  aging, audiology, epidemiology, health policy, health promotion/education, kinesiology, public health, recreation/sport/tourism, rehabilitation, speech-language pathology, sports medicine
Handouts: a variety of subject guides, lists of new books, database descriptions, Refworks, etc.
Other approaches: Health Information Portal
One-on-one:  A great deal of one-on-one for undergraduate assignments.

Other libraries:

(Undergrad) Overview of library resources for McKinley staff; We have a variety of LibGuides on health topics, as fall under various controversial topics assignments. We also maintain the H1N1 LibGuide.

 

(Reference) LibGuide: Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (http://uiuc.libguides.com/olli)

 

(VM) One-on-one, group sessions organized by the library, course-integrated sessions, LibGuides,
handouts: All handouts have been moved to webpages

 

(Music) we may create a LibGuide in the future for musicians' health and related topics in the future.

 

(Comm) One-on-one: Reference assistance in health comm, advertising of drugs, birth control, especially condom use and advertising

 

(Biotech) I frequently give sessions to grad student classes or lab groups where the topic is "how to use RefWorks", but in reality I use this as a ploy to also teach them a bit about how to search PubMed effectively, and how to set up alerts from PubMed.  These are usually Food Science department affiliates, but have also been neuroscience researchers in Entomology, or sociology grad students who are working on public health issues!

 

(Chem) We provide one-on-one and group instructional sessions on SciFinder Web and Web of Science (Science Citation Index Expanded), multidisciplinary databases that include information on health-related subjects mentioned previously (e.g., biochemistry, organic chemistry)

 

(Reference) One-on-one: General - usually course-related - delivery could be by phone, chat, e-mail or in person - note: we don't give out health related information - we only let people know how to find the info they need - whether it is through journal articles, books, libguides, etc.
LibGuides: URL's may be sent to patrons via e-mail or chat

 

  1. My unit provides other services to respond to health information needs on campus.  Specific examples include:

 

(Undergrad) maintains the H1N1/Swine Flu libguide, under current events awreness. As other health topics come to the fore, we would do the same.

 

(VM) Animal health-related library displays, web pages, links to relevant resources in veterinary medicine

 

(Reference) Referrals to McKinley or Health Sciences Library for information,

  1. Does your unit anticipate changes in the level of interest in health-related information due to the following (provide specific examples):

 

(AHS)

1. Trends in research - growing need/demand for health research, grant seeking in health; obesity, aging, neuroscience
2. Developments in degree programs - new MPH, iHealth programs
3. Outreach initiatives - could expand with appropriate staffing

(VM)

      1. Trends in research - Yes - translational medicine initiatives; one medicine/one health programs
      2. Developments in degree programs - Dual DVM/MPH degree programs
      3. Outreach initiatives - Yes - there's a new Chicago Center for Veterinary Medicine which is an extension of the CVM-Urbana

 

(Business) Trends in research --translational research, discovery in life sciences as related to health

 

(Education & Social Science) Developments in degree programs: as additional degree programs are developed, a health component is often relevant.  For example, the new bachelor's degree in social work is likely to have a health aspect.

 

(Comm) If the Communications Library incorporates the Speech Comm Collection from ESSL, we would collect and house more materials in this area since there are faculty in the Comm Dept (LAS) who do health comm research.

 

  1. My unit faces the following challenges in responding to requests for health-related information:

 

(AHS) Undergraduate students usually need instruction on how to use the online catalog and article databases in general, in order to find health-related information.
not enough staff to serve the growing number of students interested in health information; need more librarians for specialized instruction and course-integrated instruction

(VM) Access to clinical medical resources.  Particularly MDConsult.  We do not have enough simultaneous user accesses, nor do we have access to the complete version of MDConsult.  While it's not the critical tool for UIUC that is is for UIC, many new resources would be open to our users if it were made available to the Urbana campus.

 

(LIS) Students studying medical librarianship occasionally seek access to online resources (such as commercial web-based information tools aimed at practicing physicians or nurses) to which the University Library doesn't subscribe.

 

(Business) not having databases that have good pipelines for the discovery process, such as Life Science Analytics, Emerging Medical Technology, Health Devices International Sourcebase, and Medical e-Track.

 

(Reference) New GA's often don't realize that books and journals related to medicine at Urbana Health Sciences are only found through UIC catalog.   

 

6.  Are you aware of potential audiences for health information resources and services provided by the library that are currently not being reached?

 

(AHS) The local community; Students who are not finding the information they need, but don't know where to go.

 

(LIS) Possibly we could be doing more to share information/resources with public libraries that in turn provide health information to local residents.  The LIS Library has always been a passive provider of services and content to support the professional development of local librarians, but we have not targeted them or their patrons as an audience for outreach.

 

(Business) Scientists learning how to run businesses, technology transfer, and chemists who are doing discovery work.   Even kinesiologists are looking at trends in product development for therapy.    We do quite a bit on sports promotion too.

(Undergrad) Outreach to McKinley Health Center, dorms, counseling center, Campus Recreation, community.

 

Appendix G. Information Literacy Considerations

Compiled by Mary Beth Allen

 

Existing information literacy programs should definitely be continued, and there are many opportunities to expand in this direction.  There is a desire to increase the health information literacy on campus and beyond.  There is a desire to increase the number of course-integrated and stand alone sessions on aspects of health information.

 

As above, many opportunities exist, and strategic effort to increase visibility and offer more sessions is only limited by the resources available.

 

With the development of new programs in the College of Applied Health Sciences, there will be increased opportunities to integrate information literacy into the curriculum at both undergraduate and graduate levels.

 

The AHS Librarian works with the college of AHS academic advisors in each department to reach out to new students in the college.  Several faculty members in higher level courses invite information literacy into their classrooms and labs.  The AHS Librarian is in touch with Kim Graber about the role of the AHS Teaching Academy and how the library can integrate into that effort.

 

Yes, this happens with the academic advisors and faculty and teaching assistants.  There is certainly opportunity for further discussion.

 

There are several accredited programs in AHS, offering opportunities to integrate into those curriculums.

 

We are beginning to explore online instruction methods, first with the Health Information Portal, with PowerPoint slides about the Library, and continuing with online tutorials developed in cooperation with the UIC Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana.  We're also exploring live online instruction with UIC LHS-U using "e-rooms" which is similar to Elluminate.

 

Assessment has only been informal.  This is an area we can explore further.  When developing the Health Information Portal, accessibility and usability testing was a major factor in the design process.

 

Resources are needed to provide technical assistance and expertise with new software like e-rooms, Camtasia for tutorials, and web-development and social networking techniques.

 

UIC Library of the Health Sciences, Main Reference, Undergrad Library, Life Science librarians, Social Science librarians, GSLIS faculty and grad students, and AHS faculty and students are all potential partners.

 

We see a significant scope of effort in information literacy because health information is specialized and a large amount of health information is available online, both academic literature and consumer health information. 

 

 

Appendix H: Comparative Data Profile of Current Health Information Needs and Services

 

Compiled by Mary Beth Allen from various data sources, including DMI data, College of AHS data, and University Library statistical reports.

 

A wide range of existing data was consulted by the Health Information Services Planning team, including that available from campus DMI and from the Library.  The NSM website provides a link to strategic profile graphs, based on campus DMI data.  The strategic profile graph allows for comparison with any campus unit.

 

The strategic profile for the College of Applied Health Sciences clearly indicates a steady pattern of growth in student enrollment over past years, from 1053 undergraduate and 214 graduate students in 1999-00, to 1807 undergraduate and 302 graduate students in 2008-09.  The College expects enrollment growth to continue in the future, especially in response to the new iHealth and MPH degree programs.  Likewise, AHS has seen a large increase in the number of undergraduate degrees awarded, from 322 in 1999-00 to 585 in 2007-08.  Faculty numbers also increased, from 46 FTE in 1999-00 to 63 FTE in 2008-09.  This growth is significant in itself, but even more remarkable when compared with many other campus programs.  The overall pattern of growth in the College of Applied Health Sciences is an indicator of significant need and demand for library collections and services.

 

Not surprisingly, usage statistics for the Applied Health Sciences Library indicate that the physical space, the collection, and services continue to be used heavily.  A number of usage counts are collected routinely by the University Library, including gate count.  Of the 40 library units reporting gate count, the AHS Library was ranked 14th highest in fy05, 14th in fy06, 15th in fy07, 14th in fy08, and 14th highest in fy09.  The AHS Library's gate count remained steadily ranked at approximately 14th highest among all 40 units (higher than 26 other units).  The high gate count is an indicator that the AHS Library is a vital part of the of the academic activity pattern of students seeking a place for individual and collaborative work.

 

Of the 40 library units reporting the number of reference questions answered in the unit, the AHS Library was ranked 12th highest in fy06, 14th in fy07, 11th in fy08, and 12th highest in fy09.  Although overall number of reference questions received in person at the University Libraries declined during this period, the AHS Library's number remained steadily ranked at approximately 12th highest among all 40 units (higher than 28 other units).  This consistently high rank in reference questions answered indicates that students and faculty continue to rely on library services and assistance from AHS library staff as a source of expertise.

 

Circulation statistics by happening location, no reserves, indicate overall circulation activity in the unit, including charge and discharge of items from other units' permanent holdings.  The AHS Library was ranked 11th highest of over 40 library units reporting, with 7,506 total circulation transactions for 2007-08 and 7603 circulation transactions in 2008-09.  This is a high level of circulation activity, compared with other library units.

 

Circulation statistics by permanent location, no reserves, indicate use of the library unit's own collection.  The AHS Library was ranked 12th highest of over 40 library units reporting, with 10,048  in 2007-08, and  13th highest with 8,967 in 2008-09.  This indicates that the AHS Library's permanent collection is highly relevant and in current use.  

 

Looking at library public printer usage as a measure of activity in the unit, the AHS Library's printer was ranked as the 11th highest in 2008-09.  This is somewhat misleading because several units (Grainger, ACES, Undergrad) have more than one printer.  However, among library units with only one public printer, the AHS Library ranked 4th highest in use of its printer.  Students continue to use the AHS Library for their academic work, and use of the unit's public printer is an indicator of this high level of usage.

 

The Library routinely tracks information literacy instruction provided by library unit.  The AHS Library provides a consistent number of course-integrated information literacy sessions each year, requested by faculty and instructors.  Approximately 25-30 sessions are provided each academic year for both undergraduate and graduate level students across a range of courses.  Health-related literature has its own specialized search tools, and there is increasing demand for relevant library instruction that utilizes these sources.*  Demand is expected to continue in the future, with increased enrollment in new degree programs such as iHealth and the Masters in Public Health. 

 

The University Library has administered several large scale surveys of its user base in recent years, but the team concluded that results might not be especially useful because of low numbers or low percentage of participation.  One notable finding came from the University Library's survey of undergraduate students in 2005, in answer to the question, "Which University Libraries do you use on a regular basis?"  4474 undergrads answered the question.  The Applied Health Sciences Library was ranked 6th behind only the Undergrad Library, Grainger, ACES, Main Stacks, and Education & Social Science.  Plans for providing a center for health information in the University Library must take into account that there will be an increasing number of people in need of diverse library services and resources that support health information and health information literacy.

 

*Not only is the health literature specialized, but this type of librarianship is also specialized, as evidenced by the existence of an entire library association devoted to it (the Medical Library Association).   The Association of College and Research Libraries recently established a new "ACRL Health Science Interest Group," for librarians in non-medical college and research libraries.

 

Appendix I. Analysis of Health-related Databases and Services on Departmental Library Web Pages

 

Compiled by Wendy Gregory

 

 

 

A Comparison of Databases Listed on Selected U of I Library Website Homepages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U OF I LIBRARY HOMEPAGES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funk ACES

Applied Health Sciences

Biology

Biotech Info Center

Education

Health Sciences-Urbana

Undergrad*

Vet Med

DATABASES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Abstracts in social gerontology

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Academic OneFile (Infotrac)

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

Academic Search Premier (Ebsco)

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

 

ACES Theses & Dissertations

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AccessMedicine

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Ageline

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

AgNIC

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

AGRICOLA

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Agricultural Communications Documentation Center

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All ASHA journals

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alt HealthWatch

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Biological Abstracts

X

 

X

X

 

 

X

X

BioMed Central

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

CAB Abstracts

X

X

 

X

 

 

 

X

CINAHL

 

X

 

 

 

X

X

 

Clinical Pharmacology

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Cochrane Library

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

CONSULTANT

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Digital Dissertations

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

DynaMed

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

Funk ACES

Applied Health Sciences

Biology

Biotech Info Center

Education

Health Sciences-Urbana

Undergrad*

Vet Med

EconLit

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Education Full Test

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

Environmental Sciences & Pollution Management

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

ERIC

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

Faculty of 1000

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

FirstConsult

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Food Science & Technology Abstracts

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Google Scholar

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

Health & Psychosocial Instruments

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Health Source

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

Hospitality & Tourism Index

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

IDEALS

X (Ag only)

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

Illinois Harvest

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

images.MD

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ivy Academic Search

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Linguistics & language behavior abstracts

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

MD Consult

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

X

MedlinePlus

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

Mental Measurements Yearbook

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merck Veterinary Manual

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Nursing Reference Center

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Oregon PDF in Health & Performance

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

PAIS International

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

Physical Education Index

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Plants Toxic to Animals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

Funk ACES

Applied Health Sciences

Biology

Biotech Info Center

Education

Health Sciences- Urbana

Undergrad*

Vet Med

PubChem

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

PubGet

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

PubMed

X

X

X

X

 

X

X

X

PsycINFO

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

 

SciFinder (Chemical Abstracts)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

Scopus

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

X

SocINDEX

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

Sociological Abstracts

X

X

 

 

X

 

X

 

SPORT Discus

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

Sport Business Research Network

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stat!Ref

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Tests in Print

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOXNET

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

UpToDate

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Web of Knowledge (SocSci Cit Index)

 

X

 

X

X

 

 

 

Web of Science

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

X

Wildlife & Ecology Studies Worldwide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Zoological Record

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X = a direct link to the resource exists on this library's homepage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*The Undergrad Library homepage contains no databases.  The databases listed are some of those found on the "Find Articles" webpage.

 

 

 

A Comparison of Selected Miscellaneous Health Related Resources Listed on Selected

U of I Library Website Homepages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U OF I LIBRARY HOMEPAGES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funk ACES

Applied Health Sciences

Biology

Biotech Info Center

Education

Health Sciences - Urbana

Undergrad*

Vet Med

LINKS TO MISCELLANEOUS HEALTH RELATED RESOURCES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E-books

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

X

Mobile Device Applications

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

News feeds (health related only)***

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NIH Public Access Policy

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

Research/Subject Guides**

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Special Collections (print items)

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

U of I Extension

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Web 2.0 tools/services

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X = a direct link to the resource exists on this library's homepage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*The Undergrad Library homepage contains no direct links to specific resources.  The links listed are found on the "Subject Guides" webpage.

 

 

 

A Comparison of Related Libraries Listed on Selected U of I Library Website Homepages

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

U OF I LIBRARY HOMEPAGES

 

Funk ACES

Applied Health Sciences

Biology

Biotech Info Center

Education

Health Sciences - Urbana

Undergrad*

Vet Med

LINKS TO RELATED LIBRARIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Funk ACES

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

X

Applied Health Sciences

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

Biology

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

Biotech Info Center

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

Business & Economics

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

Chemistry

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

Education

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grainger (Engineering)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

Health Info Portal

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

X

Health Sciences - Chicago

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Health Sciences - Peoria

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Health Sciences - Rockford

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Health Sciences - Urbana

 

X

X

X

 

 

 

X

Illinois Natural History Survey

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

UIC - Richard J Daley

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

UIC - Science

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Undergrad

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vet Med

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X = a direct link to the resource exists on this library's homepage

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Related library list not found on Undergrad homepage.  List of libraries by major link on  the How do I...? webpage.

 

 

 

Appendix J. Organization of Health Information Services on Other University Campuses

 

Compiled by Mary Beth Allen                           11/13/09

 

Interesting findings: 

Many comprehensive universities that do not have a medical school DO offer an accredited MPH program.

 

Libraries are often organized/structured according to the way the academic colleges, schools, departments are organized/structured.

 

1)  Indiana University

May 5, 2009    BLOOMINGTON, Ind. - "In response to long-standing public health needs in Indiana, Indiana University President Michael A. McRobbie today announced a plan that calls for the formation of two schools of public health, one at IU Bloomington and the other at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis.
It is expected that the new school at IU Bloomington will be based on the School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, the third-largest school on campus, and will focus more on rural health issues, general wellness and other areas that build on the existing strengths of HPER. The school at IUPUI will grow from the Department of Public Health in the School of Medicine and is expected to focus more on urban health issues. "

Health, Physical Education and Recreation Library (HPER):  serves School of HPER

http://www.hper.indiana.edu/ 

 

School of HPER includes departments of:

Applied Health Science - with programs in Dietetics, Health Education - Secondary Teacher Preparation, Human Development and Family Studies, Nutrition Science, Public Health Education, Safety Science, Master of Public Health (MPH)

Kinesiology - with programs in athletic training, contemporary dance, exercise science, fitness specialist, sport communication, and sport marketing and management, physical education teaching

Recreation, Park, and Tourism Studies - offers specializations in Park and Recreation Management, Recreational Sport Management, Therapeutic Recreation, Tourism Management, and Outdoor Recreation and Resource Management

Recreational Sports - facilities (pools, gyms, etc.), sport/rec programs, intramurals, etc.

The Dept of Speech & Hearing Science is in the School of Arts and Sciences, and is served by the Wells Library (main humanities & social sciences)

 

2)  University of California - Berkeley

The university is organized into 8 colleges or schools.  They have a School of Public Health that offers 5 different graduate degree options across 12 areas of concentration (biostatistics, epidemiology, health policy & management, etc).   Their college of Natural Resources includes agriculture, environmental science, plant & microbial biology, and nutritional science & toxicology.  Their College of Letters & Science includes arts, humanities, physical sciences, biological sciences, and social sciences.

Library consists of Doe Library, the Bancroft Library, Moffitt Library, and more than 20 subject specialty libraries serving a variety of academic disciplines.  Bancroft has rare books & manuscripts.  Doe contains most of humanities and social sciences.  Moffitt is the "teaching library" and contains a core collection designed as an entry point for undergrads and new students; also contains computing facility.
Separate science libraries at Berkley include:
Public Health (Shelden Margen Public Health Library)  http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/PUBL/
Others:  Bioscience and Natural Resources Library, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Library, Earth Sciences and Map, Engineering, Mathematics and Statistics, Optometry and Health Sciences, Physics Astronomy, Education - Psychology

3)  Cornell Univeristy Libraries:

Flower-Sprecher Veterinary Library

Edna McConnell Clark Physical Sciences Library

Nestle Hotel Admin/Hospitality Library

Uris Library (humanities and social sciences)

Mann Library (agriculture, life sciences, human ecology, applied social sciences: biology and biotechnology, plant and animal sciences, nutrition, food science, natural resources and environmental sciences, textiles, human development, business, policy analysis, and other selected natural and social sciences)  "Mann Library supports the instruction, research, and extension programs of Cornell University's College of Agriculture and Life Sciences and College of Human Ecology."

Olin Library (social sciences and the humanities):  philosophy, religion, classics, government, political science, history, economics, history of science, linguistics, literature

+ many other libraries

-          No programs in SPSHS or Kinesiology or Recreation/Sport

Medical Library in NYC

 

4)  Northwestern University

Dept of Communication Sciences and Disorders is in School of Communication / PhD programs in audiology, hearing science, speech-language pathology, neuroscience, cognitive science (but School of Communications includes cinema, theatre, dance)

 

Galter Health Sciences Lib serves NW medical school, MPH program, physical therapy program

 

5)  University of Iowa

Hardin Library for the Health Sciences:  serves Biosciences, Communication Sciences & Disorders, Dentistry, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Public Health, Exercise Science/Health & Sports Studies

UI also has Main Library, Biological Sciences Library, Psychology Library and several other subject libraries

 

6)  Purdue University

Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences Library serves the College of Pharmacy, Nursing, and Health Sciences (health sciences here includes health physics, medical physics, toxicology, occupational and environmental health sciences, and radiation biology)

Life Sciences Library serves Agriculture, Biology, Animal Science, Food Science, Nutrition

Separate Veterinary Medicine Library

Humanities, Social Science, and Education Library (HSSE) serves Health & Kinesiology, Psychology, Speech Language & Hearing Sciences, African American Literature, Comparative Literature, Asian, Art, Anthropology, Film, foreign language education, Political Science, Philosophy, Religion, Rhetoric & Composition, Women's Studies

 

Department of Health and Kinesiology and Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences are in College of Liberal Arts

 

7)  University of Colorado

UC Boulder:  Science Library is located on the second floor of the Norlin Building (Main Library). It houses extensive science research resources and provides services to the students, faculty and community in the areas of general science, the history of science, and the life sciences.  The Science Library specifically serves:   biochemistry, chemistry, ecology and evolutionary biology, kinesiology, molecular, cellular and developmental biology, museum, psychology, speech, language & hearing sciences

 

Other floors of the Norlin Building serve art and architecture, government publications, humanities, social sciences.  They also have a commons area in Norlin.

 

Libraries outside the Norlin Building include: Business, Earth Sciences, Engineering, Map, Math/Physics, Music.


UC Denver has the medical school and library

 

8)  Pennsylvania State University Library- University Park

--Pattee Library serves Arts & Humanities (including Music), Gateway/learning commons, News/Microforms

--Paterno Library serves Business, Education & Behavioral Sciences, Life Sciences, Maps, Social Sciences, Special Collections

            ...   Within Paterno Library, the Education & Behavioral Sciences floor includes communication sciences & disorders, rehabilitation, psychology, human development & family studies, education

            ...   Within Paterno Library, the Life Sciences floor includes agriculture sciences, biological sciences, health sciences (kinesiology, health, medicine, nursing, nutrition, biobehavioral health)

 

Penn State has separate libraries for Architecture & Landscape Architecture; Earth & Mineral Sciences; Engineering; Physical & Mathematical Sciences; Law

 

Penn State has a College of Health and Human Development with the following departments:  Biobehavioral Health; Communication Sciences and Disorders; Health Policy and Administration; Hospitality Management; Human Development & Family Studies; Kinesiology; Nutritional Sciences; Recreation, Park, and Tourism Management

 

Penn State's medical school is in Hershey

 

9)  Texas A & M Libraries:      

Medical Sciences Library:  serves colleges of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Medicine, Nursing, Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, and the School of Rural Public Health

Cushing Library:  rare books

Evans Library:  serves basic sciences, engineering, humanities, and social sciences, documents, maps, and College of Education & Human Development including Deptartment of Health & Kinesiology, Educational Psychology, Recreation, Parks & Tourism

 

10)  University of Maryland-College Park
White Memorial Chemistry Library serves the School of Public Health;  College of Chemical and Life Sciences; Dept of Cell Biology & Molecular Genetics; Dept of Chemistry and Biochemistry

School of Public Health includes these departments: Epidemiology and Biostatistics; Health Services Administration; Kinesiology; Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health; Public and Community Health; Outreach (to OLLI, etc).  They offer an accredited MPH program.

Dept of Hearing and Speech Sciences is covered via the McKeldin Library (Main).

 

11)  University of Texas - Austin

College of Education includes Dept of Kinesiology and Health Education

Life Science Library: covers Biology, Medicine, Nutrition, Pharmacy, Agriculture, Biology, Microbiology, Neuroscience, Botany, Ecology, Environmental Studies, Kinesiology and Health Education, Sports and Recreation, Medicine, Consumer Health, Alternative Medicine, Pharmacy, Zoology

Perry-Castañeda Library (Main) covers Communication Sciences and Disorders

 

12)  North Carolina State University

New Hunt Library under construction on main quad - to be completed in 2012 (will provide seating for 4 times as many students as Library does now).
D. H. Hill Library, Design Library, Textiles Library, Veterinary Medicine Library
Natural Resources Library:  research and instructional support for the College of Natural Resources and the Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at NC State. The library collection supports research and teaching in forestry, natural resources, sport management, parks and recreation, tourism, paper science and engineering, wood products, biomaterials and bioenergy, and marine, earth, and atmospheric sciences.

No health focus.

13)  SUNY Albany

School of Public Health - Accredited by the Council on Education for Public Health, the School is organized into four academic departments, offering M.S., M.P.H, Dr.PH and Ph.D. degrees: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Health Sciences; Epidemiology and Biostatistics; and Health Policy, Management and Behavior

SUNY doesn't appear to have programs in Speech & Hearing Science, Kinesiology, Recreation, Sport, Tourism

Science Library serves:  Atmospheric Science, Biology, General Science, Geology, Public Health, Chemistry, Computer Science, Math, Statistics, Physics, Anthropology, Sociology, Linguistics
Dewey Graduate Library:  Gerontology, Social Welfare, Information Studies, Law, Public Administration, Public Policy, Political Science
University Library: French, Italian, Hispanic, Latin American, Caribbean, History, Criminal Justice, Music, Russian, Slavic, Art, English, Philosophy, Judaic Studies, Religion, Theatre, East Asian, Education, Reading, Government Documents, Africana, Psychology, Women's Studies, Communication, Geography & Regional Planning, Business, Economics

14)  Colorado State University
The College of Applied Human Sciences includes 8 departments and 3 interdisciplinary programs:  Department of Health and Exercise Science, Food Science & Human Nutrition, Human Development and Family Studies, Occupational Therapy, School of Education, School of Social Work, Construction Management, School of Teacher Education & Principal Preparation, Design and Merchandising, Interdepartmental major in Family and Consumer Sciences, Food Science/Safety Interdisciplinary  program, Gerontology Interdisciplinary program.

All campus is served by Morgan Library.  The Veterinary Medicine Library is the only branch library.

 

Appendix K. UIC Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana

 

Compiled by Mary Shultz

 

The Library of the Health Sciences-Urbana (LHS-U) is a regional site library for the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC).  Our main location is the Library of the Health Sciences-Chicago (LHS-C).  There are also regional site libraries in both Rockford (LHS-R) and Peoria (LHS-P).   The Library of the Health Sciences holds the current contract for the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine.  The GMR offices are located at LHS-C, but all sites, including LHS-U are members of the GMR.
 
Our Library serves the faculty, students, and staff of the College of Medicine and the College of Nursing on the Urbana campus.  Both of these Colleges are academically accredited through UIC.  LHS-U supports the teaching, research, and clinical programs of both Colleges through our service, collections, and instructional programs.  We teach in all years of the Medical School program as well as the Internal Medicine Residency.  We have curriculum-integrated instruction for both the undergraduate and graduate programs at the College of Nursing.  We are also certified for CME (continuing medical education credits) for a number of our Library webinars and workshops.  We also support them through traditional services such as circulation, interlibrary loan, and reference (both online and in person).
 
Through the design of our online Research Guides and Web pages we provide access and instruction for a vast array of health sciences resources.  As a UIC Library, LHS-U has access to over 40,000 online journals across all disciplines with approximately 8,000 in the health sciences.  For electronic books, the UIC collection is close to 100,000 titles with over 10,000 in the health sciences.  The UIC Library also licenses clinical resources such as Up To Date, DynaMed, Essential Evidence Plus, ACP PIER, Clinical Pharmacology, and First Consult.
 
LHS-U maintains a core print collection of nursing, biomedical, and clinical journals and books.  We collect materials in nursing, clinical medicine, basic sciences, medical ethics, medical humanities, history of medicine and nursing, and some public health materials.   

 

Our online and print clinical resources are heavily used by our students during their clinical years and by our faculty physicians and nursing researchers.