University of Illinois Library at Urbana Champaign Library Gateway divider line divider
 Online
 Library
 Catalogs
divider line divider
 Online
 Research
 Resources 
divider line divider
 Library
 Services
divider line divider
 Library 
 Help
divider line divider
 Site
 Map/
 Search
divider line divider
 Home

« Cellular Visions: The Inner Life of a Cell | Main | Nature's New Open Peer Review System »

September 12, 2006

American Society of Plant Biologists Members to Get Open Access for Free

It is with great pleasure that I note that the society I was associated with in a "former life", the American Society of Plant Biologists, is again venturing bravely into the arena of open access publishing! A year or so ago, they allowed their authors to make articles published in Plant Physiology or Plant Cell open access, for an additional fee of $1000. About 10% of the authors took them up on this offer. In a recent editorial the editor-in-chief of Plant Physiology announced that, as of the January 2007 issue, all articles published by ASPB members in Plant Physiology will have their articles made open access for no additional fee! This means that over 50% of the articles published in Plant Physiology in 2007 will be open access.

The reason for this change in policy? Don Ort, the editor-in-chief of Plant Physiology and UIUC Plant Biology professor, says that

there are strong reasons to believe that Open Access drives higher impact and citation by accelerating recognition and dissemination of research findings. A recent recent longitudinal bibliometric analysis of Open Access vs. non–Open Access papers published over a 6-month period in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences supports this premise (Eysenbach, 2006). Even in a journal widely available in research libraries and one that publicly releases its full content after 6 months, Open Access articles were found to be twice as likely to be cited in the first 4 to 10 months compared to non–Open Access articles.

Additionally, they note that even during the short amount of time that ASPB has offered the open access option, the open access articles
have been accessed about 10% more often and downloaded approximately 20% more often than the non–Open Access articles published in the same volumes.

No word, yet, on whether Plant Cell will follow in the footsteps of it's sister publication, Plant Physiology. Both of these journals are highly regarded, with impact factors for 2005 of 11.088 and 6.114, respectively.

Posted by Katie Newman at September 12, 2006 10:07 AM