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« Oxford Open: Publish in Oxford University Press journals in an Open Access Mode. | Main | Science Online now has RSS Feeds »

November 16, 2005

Science Online site Revamped

From Knowledgespeak

The journal Science has announced the launch of a new web site based on the merger of ScienceCareers.org and Science's Next Wave. The new site is projected as a comprehensive and freely accessible source to offer online support for science careers for scientists, career counselors, students, teachers and the public. The launch corresponds with an extensive revamp of the Science family of web sites (www.sciencemag.org) and the journal's plan to allow free access to newly published content on its ScienceNOWdaily new site.

The newly designed ScienceCareers.org features a grants directory, job listings, career advice, events and meeting schedules, a CV database, suggestions on cover letters and interviews, and information on funding opportunities. Special topic portals include the Minority Scientists Network and the Postdoc Network.

The redesign of the Science group of sites follows a string of surveys, focus groups and user testing. It was discovered that users were looking for ease in locating content on these sites and that they generally were overwhelmed by the volume of scientific information available today. The sites include the online edition of Science, ScienceNOW, Science's knowledge environments on signal transduction ("STKE") and ageing ("SAGE KE") and the new career site.

Post revamp, ScienceNOW's editors expect the site to draw teachers, students, policymakers and other members of the public, apart from the regular readership of working scientists, since no subscription is required. The Science web sites are published by AAAS, a US-based nonprofit science society.

Posted by Katie Newman at November 16, 2005 9:37 AM